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Article: Junction interaction in the seminiferous epithelium: Regulatory roles of connexin-based gap junction

TitleJunction interaction in the seminiferous epithelium: Regulatory roles of connexin-based gap junction
Authors
KeywordsConnexin
Fertility
Gap junction, hormones
Peptides
Review
Seminiferous epithelium
Signaling
Spermatogenesis
Testis
Issue Date2007
PublisherFrontiers in Bioscience. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontbiosci.org/
Citation
Frontiers In Bioscience, 2007, v. 12 n. 4, p. 1552-1562 How to Cite?
AbstractAnchoring junction, tight junction (TJ), and gap junction (GJ) constitute three major junction types in mammalian testes. Connexin is the well-studied GJ protein. It forms the building block of connexon, which is composed of six connexin units. Connexon forms the functional GJ when pairing with counter-connexon from neighboring cells. In the testis, at least eleven connexins are associated with the Sertoli and germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium and the Leydig cells of the interstitium, modulating spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis, respectively. Significantly, connexins are recently speculated to act as regulators of other junctions in the testes using pan-connexin peptide model. This demonstrates that the loss of connexin function leads to a preferential degradation of occludin-based TJ, but not N-cadherin-based adherens junction (AJ), in the testis, despite the intermingled relationship of these three junctions at the site of blood-testis barrier. In the clinical aspects, connexins are shown to relate to male infertility and testicular dysfunctions. A panel of molecules and proteins and their associated protein kinases are actively participating in the regulation of connexin-mediated GJ and fine-tuning connexin-associated functions in the testis. Herein, we summarize the latest findings of connexins in the testis in the aspects of fertility, and testicular diseases, with emphasis on the unexplored roles of connexins in regulating other junction types. This can shed light on future studies in implicating the putative roles of connexins in the physiological functions of reproduction and the clinical aspects of male infertility. In addition, understanding the roles of connexins can advance the diagnosis and treatment of testicular dysfunction and infertility.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87240
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.484
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.583
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, NPYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WSBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, JMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:27:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:27:08Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers In Bioscience, 2007, v. 12 n. 4, p. 1552-1562en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1093-9946en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87240-
dc.description.abstractAnchoring junction, tight junction (TJ), and gap junction (GJ) constitute three major junction types in mammalian testes. Connexin is the well-studied GJ protein. It forms the building block of connexon, which is composed of six connexin units. Connexon forms the functional GJ when pairing with counter-connexon from neighboring cells. In the testis, at least eleven connexins are associated with the Sertoli and germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium and the Leydig cells of the interstitium, modulating spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis, respectively. Significantly, connexins are recently speculated to act as regulators of other junctions in the testes using pan-connexin peptide model. This demonstrates that the loss of connexin function leads to a preferential degradation of occludin-based TJ, but not N-cadherin-based adherens junction (AJ), in the testis, despite the intermingled relationship of these three junctions at the site of blood-testis barrier. In the clinical aspects, connexins are shown to relate to male infertility and testicular dysfunctions. A panel of molecules and proteins and their associated protein kinases are actively participating in the regulation of connexin-mediated GJ and fine-tuning connexin-associated functions in the testis. Herein, we summarize the latest findings of connexins in the testis in the aspects of fertility, and testicular diseases, with emphasis on the unexplored roles of connexins in regulating other junction types. This can shed light on future studies in implicating the putative roles of connexins in the physiological functions of reproduction and the clinical aspects of male infertility. In addition, understanding the roles of connexins can advance the diagnosis and treatment of testicular dysfunction and infertility.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherFrontiers in Bioscience. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontbiosci.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Bioscienceen_HK
dc.subjectConnexinen_HK
dc.subjectFertilityen_HK
dc.subjectGap junction, hormonesen_HK
dc.subjectPeptidesen_HK
dc.subjectReviewen_HK
dc.subjectSeminiferous epitheliumen_HK
dc.subjectSignalingen_HK
dc.subjectSpermatogenesisen_HK
dc.subjectTestisen_HK
dc.titleJunction interaction in the seminiferous epithelium: Regulatory roles of connexin-based gap junctionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1093-9946&volume=12&spage=1552&epage=1562&date=2007&atitle=Junction+interaction+in+the+seminiferous+epithelium:+regulatory+roles+of+connexin-based+gap+junctionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, NPY: nikkilee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYeung, WSB: wsbyeung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, JMC: jmluk@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, NPY=rp00263en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, WSB=rp00331en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, JMC=rp00349en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.2741/2168en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17127402-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34249813392en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros126374en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34249813392&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1552en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1562en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243745000125-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, NPY=7402722690en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, WSB=7102370745en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, JMC=7006777791en_HK

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