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Article: Perceived peer smoking prevalence and its association with smoking behaviours and intentions in Hong Kong Chinese adolescents

TitlePerceived peer smoking prevalence and its association with smoking behaviours and intentions in Hong Kong Chinese adolescents
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/ADD
Citation
Addiction, 2004, v. 99 n. 9, p. 1195-1205 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Among the many personal, social and environmental risk factors of adolescence smoking, normative beliefs stand out for their potential to be modified with factual information on smoking prevalence. Aims: To study the perceived peer smoking prevalence and its association with smoking behaviours in Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. Design and setting: Cross-sectional territorial-wide school-based survey conducted in 64 randomly selected secondary schools in Hong Kong. Participants: A total of 13 280 forms 1-3 students (equivalent to grades 7-9 in the United States) aged 12-16 years. Measurements: Perceived peer smoking prevalence, smoking status, intention to smoke in future, other smoking-related factors and demographic information. Findings: Overestimation of peer smoking prevalence was observed regardless of gender and smoking status, and was more common in girls (69.4%) than boys (61.0%), and in experimental (74.3%) and current smokers (85.4%) than in never smokers (60.7%). Boys who overestimated and grossly overestimated (over two times) peer smoking were more likely to be current smokers, with adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of 1.95 (1.24-3.07) and 3.52 (2.37-5.24) (P for trend <0.001). Similarly, boys who grossly overestimated peer smoking were 76% (95% CI: 41-120%) more likely to have ever smoked. Conclusion: Overestimation of peer smoking prevalence was common in Hong Kong Chinese boys and girls, and was associated with current and ever smoking in boys. These findings have important implications on normative education in adolescence smoking prevention programmes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87000
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.972
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.086
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMan, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSai, YHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTai, HLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:23:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:23:56Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAddiction, 2004, v. 99 n. 9, p. 1195-1205en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0965-2140en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87000-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Among the many personal, social and environmental risk factors of adolescence smoking, normative beliefs stand out for their potential to be modified with factual information on smoking prevalence. Aims: To study the perceived peer smoking prevalence and its association with smoking behaviours in Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. Design and setting: Cross-sectional territorial-wide school-based survey conducted in 64 randomly selected secondary schools in Hong Kong. Participants: A total of 13 280 forms 1-3 students (equivalent to grades 7-9 in the United States) aged 12-16 years. Measurements: Perceived peer smoking prevalence, smoking status, intention to smoke in future, other smoking-related factors and demographic information. Findings: Overestimation of peer smoking prevalence was observed regardless of gender and smoking status, and was more common in girls (69.4%) than boys (61.0%), and in experimental (74.3%) and current smokers (85.4%) than in never smokers (60.7%). Boys who overestimated and grossly overestimated (over two times) peer smoking were more likely to be current smokers, with adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of 1.95 (1.24-3.07) and 3.52 (2.37-5.24) (P for trend <0.001). Similarly, boys who grossly overestimated peer smoking were 76% (95% CI: 41-120%) more likely to have ever smoked. Conclusion: Overestimation of peer smoking prevalence was common in Hong Kong Chinese boys and girls, and was associated with current and ever smoking in boys. These findings have important implications on normative education in adolescence smoking prevention programmes.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/ADDen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAddictionen_HK
dc.rightsAddiction. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescent Behavioren_HK
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChina - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshIntentionen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshPeer Groupen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshSmoking - epidemiology - psychologyen_HK
dc.titlePerceived peer smoking prevalence and its association with smoking behaviours and intentions in Hong Kong Chinese adolescentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0965-2140&volume=99&spage=1195&epage=1205&date=2004&atitle=Perceived+peer+smoking+prevalence+and+its+association+with+smoking+behaviours+and+intentions+in+Hong+Kong+Chinese+adolescentsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSai, YH:syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySai, YH=rp00427en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1360-0443.2004.00797.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15317641en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4544341818en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros95450en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4544341818&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume99en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1195en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1205en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000223721100020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMan, KL=35979490800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSai, YH=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTai, HL=7201668640en_HK

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