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Article: Passive smoking and tuberculosis
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TitlePassive smoking and tuberculosis
 
AuthorsLeung, CC1
Lam, TH2
Ho, KS3
Yew, WW4
Tam, CM1
Chan, WM3
Law, WS1
Chan, CK1
Chang, KC1
Au, KF1
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archinternmed.com
 
CitationArchives Of Internal Medicine, 2010, v. 170 n. 3, p. 287-292 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archinternmed.2009.506
 
AbstractBackground: Increasing evidence has incriminated active smoking as a causal factor for tuberculosis (TB). However, the effect of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on TB has not been similarly elucidated. Methods: A cohort of 15 486 female never-smokers aged 65 to 74 years and living with their surviving husband were enrolled at 18 Elderly Health Centers in Hong Kong from 2000 to 2003 and followed up prospectively through linkage with the territory-wide TB notification registry and death registry for TB and death until December 31, 2008, using an identity card number as a unique identifier. The relationship between passive smoking and the development of TB was assessed with adjustment for other baseline characteristics. Results: Passive exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke in the household was independently associated with obstructive lung disease (odds [OR], 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.77) and diabetes mellitus (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02-1.26) at baseline and with the development of both active TB (hazard ratio [HR], 1.49; 95% CI, 1.01-2.19) and culture-confirmed TB (HR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.04-2.80) on prospective follow-up after potentially confounding background variables were controlled for. Passive smoking accounted for 13.7% of active TB and for 18.5% of culture-positive TB in this cohort. Conclusions: Similar to active smoking, passive exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke in the household also predisposes to the development of TB. Increased emphasis should therefore be put on tobacco control in national TB programs. ©2010 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0003-9926
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archinternmed.2009.506
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000274291100011
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CC
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, KS
 
dc.contributor.authorYew, WW
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WS
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, CK
 
dc.contributor.authorChang, KC
 
dc.contributor.authorAu, KF
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:23:55Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:23:55Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Increasing evidence has incriminated active smoking as a causal factor for tuberculosis (TB). However, the effect of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on TB has not been similarly elucidated. Methods: A cohort of 15 486 female never-smokers aged 65 to 74 years and living with their surviving husband were enrolled at 18 Elderly Health Centers in Hong Kong from 2000 to 2003 and followed up prospectively through linkage with the territory-wide TB notification registry and death registry for TB and death until December 31, 2008, using an identity card number as a unique identifier. The relationship between passive smoking and the development of TB was assessed with adjustment for other baseline characteristics. Results: Passive exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke in the household was independently associated with obstructive lung disease (odds [OR], 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.77) and diabetes mellitus (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02-1.26) at baseline and with the development of both active TB (hazard ratio [HR], 1.49; 95% CI, 1.01-2.19) and culture-confirmed TB (HR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.04-2.80) on prospective follow-up after potentially confounding background variables were controlled for. Passive smoking accounted for 13.7% of active TB and for 18.5% of culture-positive TB in this cohort. Conclusions: Similar to active smoking, passive exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke in the household also predisposes to the development of TB. Increased emphasis should therefore be put on tobacco control in national TB programs. ©2010 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Internal Medicine, 2010, v. 170 n. 3, p. 287-292 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archinternmed.2009.506
 
dc.identifier.citeulike6668272
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archinternmed.2009.506
 
dc.identifier.eissn2168-6114
 
dc.identifier.epage292
 
dc.identifier.hkuros168860
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274291100011
 
dc.identifier.issn0003-9926
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid20142576
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-76149121478
 
dc.identifier.spage287
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86999
 
dc.identifier.volume170
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archinternmed.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Internal Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshConfidence Intervals
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshIncidence
 
dc.subject.meshPrognosis
 
dc.subject.meshProportional Hazards Models
 
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
 
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
 
dc.subject.meshTobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
 
dc.subject.meshTuberculosis - epidemiology - etiology
 
dc.titlePassive smoking and tuberculosis
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Tam, CM</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Chan, CK</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Background: Increasing evidence has incriminated active smoking as a causal factor for tuberculosis (TB). However, the effect of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on TB has not been similarly elucidated. Methods: A cohort of 15 486 female never-smokers aged 65 to 74 years and living with their surviving husband were enrolled at 18 Elderly Health Centers in Hong Kong from 2000 to 2003 and followed up prospectively through linkage with the territory-wide TB notification registry and death registry for TB and death until December 31, 2008, using an identity card number as a unique identifier. The relationship between passive smoking and the development of TB was assessed with adjustment for other baseline characteristics. Results: Passive exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke in the household was independently associated with obstructive lung disease (odds [OR], 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.77) and diabetes mellitus (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02-1.26) at baseline and with the development of both active TB (hazard ratio [HR], 1.49; 95% CI, 1.01-2.19) and culture-confirmed TB (HR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.04-2.80) on prospective follow-up after potentially confounding background variables were controlled for. Passive smoking accounted for 13.7% of active TB and for 18.5% of culture-positive TB in this cohort. Conclusions: Similar to active smoking, passive exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke in the household also predisposes to the development of TB. Increased emphasis should therefore be put on tobacco control in national TB programs. &#169;2010 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Tuberculosis and Chest Service
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Hong Kong Government
  4. Grantham Hospital Hong Kong