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Article: Obesity and depressive symptoms in Chinese elderly

TitleObesity and depressive symptoms in Chinese elderly
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294
Citation
International Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2004, v. 19 n. 1, p. 68-74 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: The main objective was to examine the association between obesity and depressive symptoms among Chinese elderly in Hong Kong. Methods: Cross-sectional data on depressive symptoms and body mass index from 56167 clients aged 65 or over who enrolled as members of Elderly Health Centres from July 1998 to December 2000 were analysed using multiple logistic regression with adjustment of potential confounders. Results: Among 18750 men and 37417 women, the prevalence [95% confidence interval (CI)] of depressive symptoms (based on the Geriatric Depression Scale) was 4.9% (4.6-5.2%) and 7.9% (7.6-8.1 %) respectively (p < 0.001). The prevalence of obesity (by World Health Organisation Asian standard: body mass index ≥25.0) in women was significantly higher than that of men (42.1% (41.6-42.7%) vs 36.6% (35.9-37.3%), p < 0.001). Obese men and women were about 20% less likely to suffer from depressive symptoms compared with those with normal weight after adjustment for confounders, with odds ratios (95% CI) of 0.82 (0.69-0.97) and 0.78 (0.71-0.86) respectively. Negative linear trends were observed between depressive symptoms and BMI categories in both sexes, and women showed a greater slope and stronger statistical significance than men. Conclusions: Both obese elderly men and women in Hong Kong were less likely to suffer from depressive symptoms than those of normal weight. The results support the 'jolly fat' hypothesis previously restricted to men, and extend the hypothesis to female elderly. Chinese traditional culture and positive values towards obesity may be protective against depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86997
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.699
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.382
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, ZBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, KSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, MPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:23:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:23:54Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2004, v. 19 n. 1, p. 68-74en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0885-6230en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86997-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The main objective was to examine the association between obesity and depressive symptoms among Chinese elderly in Hong Kong. Methods: Cross-sectional data on depressive symptoms and body mass index from 56167 clients aged 65 or over who enrolled as members of Elderly Health Centres from July 1998 to December 2000 were analysed using multiple logistic regression with adjustment of potential confounders. Results: Among 18750 men and 37417 women, the prevalence [95% confidence interval (CI)] of depressive symptoms (based on the Geriatric Depression Scale) was 4.9% (4.6-5.2%) and 7.9% (7.6-8.1 %) respectively (p < 0.001). The prevalence of obesity (by World Health Organisation Asian standard: body mass index ≥25.0) in women was significantly higher than that of men (42.1% (41.6-42.7%) vs 36.6% (35.9-37.3%), p < 0.001). Obese men and women were about 20% less likely to suffer from depressive symptoms compared with those with normal weight after adjustment for confounders, with odds ratios (95% CI) of 0.82 (0.69-0.97) and 0.78 (0.71-0.86) respectively. Negative linear trends were observed between depressive symptoms and BMI categories in both sexes, and women showed a greater slope and stronger statistical significance than men. Conclusions: Both obese elderly men and women in Hong Kong were less likely to suffer from depressive symptoms than those of normal weight. The results support the 'jolly fat' hypothesis previously restricted to men, and extend the hypothesis to female elderly. Chinese traditional culture and positive values towards obesity may be protective against depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatryen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshDepression - complications - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshObesity - epidemiology - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_HK
dc.titleObesity and depressive symptoms in Chinese elderlyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0885-6230&volume=19&spage=68&epage=74&date=2004&atitle=Obesity+and+depressive+symptoms+in+Chinese+elderlyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY:syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/gps.1040en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid14716701-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0842325090en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros85462en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0842325090&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage68en_HK
dc.identifier.epage74en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000188541600009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, ZB=7409078634en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, WM=7403914485en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, KS=7403581605en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, MP=7405265034en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK

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