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Article: Alcohol sensitivity, alcohol use and hypertension in an older Chinese population: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

TitleAlcohol sensitivity, alcohol use and hypertension in an older Chinese population: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/hr/index.html
Citation
Hypertension Research, 2009, v. 32 n. 9, p. 741-747 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough the J-shaped association between alcohol consumption and blood pressure (BP) is well known, the effect of alcohol sensitivity on this relationship is less clear. We studied the association of alcohol sensitivity and alcohol use with BP and hypertension. This cross-sectional analysis included 19335 older participants from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study recruited from 2003 to 2006, using clinically measured BP and self-reported alcohol use and alcohol sensitivity. Alcohol use was rare in women, in whom light-to-moderate drinkers (<140 g ethanol per week) without alcohol sensitivity had lower systolic and diastolic BPs (mean difference 5.3 (95% CI 3.8-6.9) mmHg and 1.9 (1.1-2.7) mm Hg, respectively) and a reduced risk of hypertension (0.62 (0.53-0.72)) relative to never drinkers. Similarly, excessive drinkers (≥140g ethanol per week) without alcohol sensitivity had a significantly higher systolic and diastolic BP and risk of hypertension than did nondrinkers (mean difference 5.1 (2.8-7.4) mm Hg, 2.7 (1.5-4.0) mm Hg and 34% (8-66%), respectively, for men). These differences were even greater for men with alcohol sensitivity (mean differences 12.0 (8.9-15.2) mm Hg, 6.2 (4.5-7.9) mmHg and 95% CI (46-159%), respectively). Alcohol sensitivity and alcohol use were both associated with elevated BP and risk of hypertension in an older Chinese population. Alcohol sensitivity may aggravate the effect of drinking on BP. Limiting alcohol use to two drinks per day for men and one drink a day for women may be suitable for East Asians. Reduction of alcohol consumption should be an important public health target.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86992
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.208
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.351
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau
Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital, Guangzhou, China
University of Birmingham, UK.
Funding Information:

The Guangzhou Cohort Study investigators include the following: Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital: WS Zhang, XQ Lao, M Cao, T Zhu, B Liu, CQ Jiang (Co-PI); The University of Hong Kong: CM Schooling, SM McGhee, RF Fielding, GM Leung, TH Lam (Co-PI); The University of Birmingham: P Adab, GN Thomas, P Yin, KB Lam, KK Cheng (Co-PI). We also thank Prof Sir R Peto and Dr ZM Chen of the Clinical Trial Service Unit, The University of Oxford for their support. This study was funded by The University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, and the University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, and Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital, Guangzhou, China; and the University of Birmingham, UK.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAdab, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KBHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:23:50Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:23:50Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHypertension Research, 2009, v. 32 n. 9, p. 741-747en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0916-9636en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86992-
dc.description.abstractAlthough the J-shaped association between alcohol consumption and blood pressure (BP) is well known, the effect of alcohol sensitivity on this relationship is less clear. We studied the association of alcohol sensitivity and alcohol use with BP and hypertension. This cross-sectional analysis included 19335 older participants from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study recruited from 2003 to 2006, using clinically measured BP and self-reported alcohol use and alcohol sensitivity. Alcohol use was rare in women, in whom light-to-moderate drinkers (<140 g ethanol per week) without alcohol sensitivity had lower systolic and diastolic BPs (mean difference 5.3 (95% CI 3.8-6.9) mmHg and 1.9 (1.1-2.7) mm Hg, respectively) and a reduced risk of hypertension (0.62 (0.53-0.72)) relative to never drinkers. Similarly, excessive drinkers (≥140g ethanol per week) without alcohol sensitivity had a significantly higher systolic and diastolic BP and risk of hypertension than did nondrinkers (mean difference 5.1 (2.8-7.4) mm Hg, 2.7 (1.5-4.0) mm Hg and 34% (8-66%), respectively, for men). These differences were even greater for men with alcohol sensitivity (mean differences 12.0 (8.9-15.2) mm Hg, 6.2 (4.5-7.9) mmHg and 95% CI (46-159%), respectively). Alcohol sensitivity and alcohol use were both associated with elevated BP and risk of hypertension in an older Chinese population. Alcohol sensitivity may aggravate the effect of drinking on BP. Limiting alcohol use to two drinks per day for men and one drink a day for women may be suitable for East Asians. Reduction of alcohol consumption should be an important public health target.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/hr/index.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHypertension Researchen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinking - epidemiology - physiopathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressure - drug effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCentral Nervous System Depressants - pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshEthanol - pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshHypertension - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen_HK
dc.subject.meshLipids - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen_HK
dc.subject.meshSmoking - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_HK
dc.subject.meshWaist Circumferenceen_HK
dc.titleAlcohol sensitivity, alcohol use and hypertension in an older Chinese population: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0916-9636&volume=32&issue=9&spage=741&epage=747&date=2009&atitle=Alcohol+sensitivity,+alcohol+use+and+hypertension+in+an+older+Chinese+population:+The+Guangzhou+Biobank+Cohort+Studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/hr.2009.92en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19557005-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70249131801en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros168730en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70249131801&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume32en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage741en_HK
dc.identifier.epage747en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269493200006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=39862329800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=40261704400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAdab, P=6601949045en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, B=36079151900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KBH=35168055500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8290733-

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