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Article: Smoking cessation intervention in parents of young children: A randomised controlled trial
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TitleSmoking cessation intervention in parents of young children: A randomised controlled trial
 
AuthorsAbdullah, ASM1 2
Mak, YW3
Loke, AY3
Lam, TH1
 
KeywordsChinese
Intervention
Parents
Randomized controlled trial
Smoking Cessation
Young children
 
Issue Date2005
 
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/ADD
 
CitationAddiction, 2005, v. 100 n. 11, p. 1731-1740 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2005.01231.x
 
AbstractObjective: To examine whether telephone counselling based on the stages of change component of Transtheoretical model of behaviour change together with educational materials could help non-motivated smoking parents of young children to cease. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, PR China. Participants: 952 smoker fathers and mothers of Chinese children aged 5 years. Intervention: Participants were randomly allocated into two groups: the intervention group received printed self-help materials and three-session telephone-based smoking cessation counselling delivered by trained counsellors; the control group received printed self-help materials only. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6 month follow up. Main outcome measures: The main outcome is 7 day point prevalence quit rate at 6 months (defined as not smoking during the 7 days preceding the 6 month follow up) determined by self reports. Other secondary outcomes were self reported 24 h point prevalence quit rate and self-reported continuous quit rate and bio-chemically validated quit rate at 6 months. Results: A total of 952 smoker fathers and mothers were randomized to the intervention (n = 467) and control (n = 485) groups. Most were daily smokers (92.4%) and the mean number of cigarettes smoked per day was 14.5 (SD = 8.9). By using intention-to-treat analysis, the 7 day point prevalence quit rate at 6 month follow up was significantly greater in the intervention group (15.3%; 68/444) than the control group (7.4%; 34/459) (P < 0.001). The absolute risk reduction was 7.9% (95% confidence interval: 3.78% to 12.01%). The number needed to treat to get one additional smoker to quit was 13 (95% CI: 8-26). The crude odds ratio of quitting was 2.3(95% CI: 1.5-3.5). The adjusted odds ratio was 2.1 (95% CI: 1.4-3.4) (adjusted for age, number of years smoked, and alcohol dependency). Conclusion Proactive telephone counselling is an effective aid to promote smoking cessation among parents of young children. © 2005 Society for the Study of Addiction.
 
ISSN0965-2140
2013 Impact Factor: 4.596
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.172
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2005.01231.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000232849400018
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorAbdullah, ASM
 
dc.contributor.authorMak, YW
 
dc.contributor.authorLoke, AY
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:23:31Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:23:31Z
 
dc.date.issued2005
 
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine whether telephone counselling based on the stages of change component of Transtheoretical model of behaviour change together with educational materials could help non-motivated smoking parents of young children to cease. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, PR China. Participants: 952 smoker fathers and mothers of Chinese children aged 5 years. Intervention: Participants were randomly allocated into two groups: the intervention group received printed self-help materials and three-session telephone-based smoking cessation counselling delivered by trained counsellors; the control group received printed self-help materials only. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6 month follow up. Main outcome measures: The main outcome is 7 day point prevalence quit rate at 6 months (defined as not smoking during the 7 days preceding the 6 month follow up) determined by self reports. Other secondary outcomes were self reported 24 h point prevalence quit rate and self-reported continuous quit rate and bio-chemically validated quit rate at 6 months. Results: A total of 952 smoker fathers and mothers were randomized to the intervention (n = 467) and control (n = 485) groups. Most were daily smokers (92.4%) and the mean number of cigarettes smoked per day was 14.5 (SD = 8.9). By using intention-to-treat analysis, the 7 day point prevalence quit rate at 6 month follow up was significantly greater in the intervention group (15.3%; 68/444) than the control group (7.4%; 34/459) (P < 0.001). The absolute risk reduction was 7.9% (95% confidence interval: 3.78% to 12.01%). The number needed to treat to get one additional smoker to quit was 13 (95% CI: 8-26). The crude odds ratio of quitting was 2.3(95% CI: 1.5-3.5). The adjusted odds ratio was 2.1 (95% CI: 1.4-3.4) (adjusted for age, number of years smoked, and alcohol dependency). Conclusion Proactive telephone counselling is an effective aid to promote smoking cessation among parents of young children. © 2005 Society for the Study of Addiction.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAddiction, 2005, v. 100 n. 11, p. 1731-1740 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2005.01231.x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike371177
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2005.01231.x
 
dc.identifier.epage1740
 
dc.identifier.hkuros111157
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232849400018
 
dc.identifier.issn0965-2140
2013 Impact Factor: 4.596
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.172
 
dc.identifier.issue11
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid16277633
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27744533534
 
dc.identifier.spage1731
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86966
 
dc.identifier.volume100
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/ADD
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofAddiction
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsAddiction. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
 
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
 
dc.subject.meshCounseling - methods
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Education - methods
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshParents - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshSmoking - prevention & control
 
dc.subject.meshSmoking Cessation - methods
 
dc.subject.meshTelephone
 
dc.subject.meshTobacco Smoke Pollution - prevention & control
 
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
 
dc.subjectChinese
 
dc.subjectIntervention
 
dc.subjectParents
 
dc.subjectRandomized controlled trial
 
dc.subjectSmoking Cessation
 
dc.subjectYoung children
 
dc.titleSmoking cessation intervention in parents of young children: A randomised controlled trial
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Boston University School of Public Health
  3. Hong Kong Polytechnic University