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Article: Physicians' attitudes towards the computerization of clinical practice in Hong Kong: A population study

TitlePhysicians' attitudes towards the computerization of clinical practice in Hong Kong: A population study
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijmedinf
Citation
International Journal Of Medical Informatics, 2002, v. 65 n. 1, p. 41-49 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To identify the prevailing attitudes among physicians to use of computers in the clinical setting and specifically those attitudes that may be associated with the adoption of computers in practice. Design: A self-completed, 20-question postal questionnaire sent to 4850 randomly selected physicians. The questionnaire focused on details of the physicians' practice; actual computerization of or intention to computerize clinical and administrative functions; attitudes towards computerization; self-perceived computer ability and knowledge; and demographic information. The attitude statements were grouped under four themes according to a factor analysis. Results: The survey was completed by 897 physicians. Only physicians in 'individual' practices were included in the analysis. This group was further dichotomized into clinical users (those with one or more clinical functions computerized) and non-clinical users. Non-clinical users were older and had fewer specialist qualifications. Although there was strong support for the attitude statements among both groups with regard to the benefit of computerization to patient care, there was much less support for electronic medical records. Non-clinical users were concerned about the potentially negative impact of computerization on the clinical encounter and the perceived high cost of computerization. Discussion: The attitudes among current clinical users and non-users were substantially different. The most important disincentives to computerization were the potential for interference with the patient-physician encounter and the cost of computerizing multiple practice locations. Turning these disincentives into opportunities for change remains the challenge. Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86964
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.363
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.405
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, JFKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:23:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:23:30Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Medical Informatics, 2002, v. 65 n. 1, p. 41-49en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1386-5056en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86964-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To identify the prevailing attitudes among physicians to use of computers in the clinical setting and specifically those attitudes that may be associated with the adoption of computers in practice. Design: A self-completed, 20-question postal questionnaire sent to 4850 randomly selected physicians. The questionnaire focused on details of the physicians' practice; actual computerization of or intention to computerize clinical and administrative functions; attitudes towards computerization; self-perceived computer ability and knowledge; and demographic information. The attitude statements were grouped under four themes according to a factor analysis. Results: The survey was completed by 897 physicians. Only physicians in 'individual' practices were included in the analysis. This group was further dichotomized into clinical users (those with one or more clinical functions computerized) and non-clinical users. Non-clinical users were older and had fewer specialist qualifications. Although there was strong support for the attitude statements among both groups with regard to the benefit of computerization to patient care, there was much less support for electronic medical records. Non-clinical users were concerned about the potentially negative impact of computerization on the clinical encounter and the perceived high cost of computerization. Discussion: The attitudes among current clinical users and non-users were substantially different. The most important disincentives to computerization were the potential for interference with the patient-physician encounter and the cost of computerizing multiple practice locations. Turning these disincentives into opportunities for change remains the challenge. Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijmedinfen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Medical Informaticsen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Medical Informatics. Copyright © Elsevier Ireland Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Computersen_HK
dc.subject.meshFactor Analysis, Statisticalen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhysicians - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_HK
dc.titlePhysicians' attitudes towards the computerization of clinical practice in Hong Kong: A population studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1386-5056&volume=65&spage=41&epage=49&date=2002&atitle=Physicians%27+attitudes+towards+the+computerization+of+clinical+practice+in+Hong+Kong:+a+population+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJohnston, JM:jjohnsto@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM:lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJohnston, JM=rp00375en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1386-5056(02)00005-9en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11904247-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036195125en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros65962en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036195125&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume65en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage41en_HK
dc.identifier.epage49en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000174859300005-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohnston, JM=7403397964en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, JFK=15825753200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK

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