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Article: Declines in tobacco brand recognition and ever-smoking rates among young children following restrictions on tobacco advertisements in Hong Kong

TitleDeclines in tobacco brand recognition and ever-smoking rates among young children following restrictions on tobacco advertisements in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jpubhealth.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Journal Of Public Health, 2004, v. 26 n. 1, p. 24-30 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: We compared the recognition of tobacco brands and ever-smoking rates in young children before (1991) and after (2001) the implementation of cigarette advertising restrictions in Hong Kong and identified continuing sources of tobacco promotion exposure. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 824 primary school children aged from 8 to 11 (Primary classes 3-4) living in two Hong Kong districts was carried out using self-completed questionnaires examining smoking behaviour and recognition of names and logos from 18 tobacco, food, drink and other brands common in Hong Kong. Results: Ever-smoking prevalence in 2001 was 3.8 per cent (1991, 7.8 per cent). Tobacco brand recognition rates ranged from 5.3 per cent (Viceroy name) to 72.8 per cent (Viceroy logo). Compared with 1991, in 2001 never-smoker children recognized fewer tobacco brand names and logos: Marlboro logo recognition rate fell by 55.3 per cent. Similar declines were also seen in ever-smoker children, with recognition of the Marlboro logo decreasing 48 per cent. Recognition rates declined amongst both boys and girls. Children from non-smoking families constituted 51 per cent (426) of the sample, whereas 34.5 per cent (284), 8.5 per cent (70), 1.7 per cent (14) and 4.4 per cent (36) of the children had one, two, three or more than three smoking family members at home, respectively. Tobacco brand recognition rates and ever-smoking prevalence were significantly higher among children with smoking family members compared with those without. Among 12 possible sources of exposure to cigarette brand names and logos, retail stalls (75.5 per cent; 622), indirect advertisements (71.5 per cent; 589) and magazines (65.3 per cent; 538) were ranked the most common. Conclusion: Advertising restrictions in Hong Kong have effectively decreased primary-age children's recognition of tobacco branding. However, these children remain vulnerable to branding, mostly through exposure from family smokers, point-of-sale tobacco advertisement and occasional promotions. Action to curb these is now required.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86947
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.019
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.933
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorChee, YYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChoi, KMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChu, TKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKato, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSin, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, KTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, HMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, KMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:23:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:23:17Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Public Health, 2004, v. 26 n. 1, p. 24-30en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1741-3842en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86947-
dc.description.abstractBackground: We compared the recognition of tobacco brands and ever-smoking rates in young children before (1991) and after (2001) the implementation of cigarette advertising restrictions in Hong Kong and identified continuing sources of tobacco promotion exposure. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 824 primary school children aged from 8 to 11 (Primary classes 3-4) living in two Hong Kong districts was carried out using self-completed questionnaires examining smoking behaviour and recognition of names and logos from 18 tobacco, food, drink and other brands common in Hong Kong. Results: Ever-smoking prevalence in 2001 was 3.8 per cent (1991, 7.8 per cent). Tobacco brand recognition rates ranged from 5.3 per cent (Viceroy name) to 72.8 per cent (Viceroy logo). Compared with 1991, in 2001 never-smoker children recognized fewer tobacco brand names and logos: Marlboro logo recognition rate fell by 55.3 per cent. Similar declines were also seen in ever-smoker children, with recognition of the Marlboro logo decreasing 48 per cent. Recognition rates declined amongst both boys and girls. Children from non-smoking families constituted 51 per cent (426) of the sample, whereas 34.5 per cent (284), 8.5 per cent (70), 1.7 per cent (14) and 4.4 per cent (36) of the children had one, two, three or more than three smoking family members at home, respectively. Tobacco brand recognition rates and ever-smoking prevalence were significantly higher among children with smoking family members compared with those without. Among 12 possible sources of exposure to cigarette brand names and logos, retail stalls (75.5 per cent; 622), indirect advertisements (71.5 per cent; 589) and magazines (65.3 per cent; 538) were ranked the most common. Conclusion: Advertising restrictions in Hong Kong have effectively decreased primary-age children's recognition of tobacco branding. However, these children remain vulnerable to branding, mostly through exposure from family smokers, point-of-sale tobacco advertisement and occasional promotions. Action to curb these is now required.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jpubhealth.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Public Healthen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Public Health. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdvertising as Topicen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild Behavior - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFamily - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotion - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_HK
dc.subject.meshRecognition (Psychology)en_HK
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshSmoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSmoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshStudents - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTobacco Industryen_HK
dc.titleDeclines in tobacco brand recognition and ever-smoking rates among young children following restrictions on tobacco advertisements in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1741-3842&volume=26&issue=1&spage=24&epage=30&date=2004&atitle=Declines+in+tobacco+brand+recognition+and+ever-smoking+rates+among+young+children+following+restrictions+on+tobacco+advertisements+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid15044569-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2942716904en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros85863en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-2942716904&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume26en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage24en_HK
dc.identifier.epage30en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000222040100007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChee, YY=7005377854en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoi, KM=7403949883en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, TK=7401775839en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKato, K=7406871221en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, SK=7402279473en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSin, KL=7006839398en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, KT=7401589410en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, HM=7402864967en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KM=35118458300en_HK

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