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Article: Is exercise protective against influenza-associated mortality?

TitleIs exercise protective against influenza-associated mortality?
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2008, v. 3 n. 5 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Little is known about the effect of physical exercise on influenza-associated mortality. Methods and Findings: We collected information about exercise habits and other lifestyle, and socioeconomic and demographic status, the underlying cause of death of 24,656 adults (21% aged 30-64, 79% aged 65 or above who died in 1998 in Hong Kong, and the weekly proportion of specimens positive for influenza A (H3N1 and H1N1) and B isolation during the same period. We assessed the excess risks (ER) of influenza-associated mortality due to all-natural causes, cardiovascular diseases, or respiratory disease among different levels of exercise: never/seldom (less than once per month), low/moderate (once per month to three times per week), and frequent (four times or more per week) by Poisson regression. We also assessed the differences in ER between exercise groups by case-only logistic regression. For all the mortality outcomes under study in relation to each 10% increase in weekly proportion of specimens positive for influenza A+B, never/seldom exercise (as reference) was associated with 5.8% to 8.5% excess risks (ER) of mortality (P<0.0001), while low/moderate exercise was associated with ER which were 4.2% to 6.4% lower than those of the reference (P<0.001 for all-natural causes; P=0.001 for cardiovascular; and P=0.07 for respiratory mortality). Frequent exercise was not different from the reference (change in ER -0.8% to 1.7%, P=0.30 to 0.73). Conclusion: When compared with never or seldom exercise, exercising at low to moderate frequency is beneficial with lower influenza-associated mortality. © 2008 Wong et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86939
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Health and Health Services Research Fund631012
Research Fund for the Control of Infectious DiseasesHKU-AA-008
Funding Information:

This study was funded by the Health and Health Services Research Fund (#631012), who provided the Lifestyle and Mortality Study (LIMOR), and the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (#HKU-AA-008) funding.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, HKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOu, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThach, TCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorChau, YKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:23:11Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:23:11Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2008, v. 3 n. 5en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86939-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Little is known about the effect of physical exercise on influenza-associated mortality. Methods and Findings: We collected information about exercise habits and other lifestyle, and socioeconomic and demographic status, the underlying cause of death of 24,656 adults (21% aged 30-64, 79% aged 65 or above who died in 1998 in Hong Kong, and the weekly proportion of specimens positive for influenza A (H3N1 and H1N1) and B isolation during the same period. We assessed the excess risks (ER) of influenza-associated mortality due to all-natural causes, cardiovascular diseases, or respiratory disease among different levels of exercise: never/seldom (less than once per month), low/moderate (once per month to three times per week), and frequent (four times or more per week) by Poisson regression. We also assessed the differences in ER between exercise groups by case-only logistic regression. For all the mortality outcomes under study in relation to each 10% increase in weekly proportion of specimens positive for influenza A+B, never/seldom exercise (as reference) was associated with 5.8% to 8.5% excess risks (ER) of mortality (P<0.0001), while low/moderate exercise was associated with ER which were 4.2% to 6.4% lower than those of the reference (P<0.001 for all-natural causes; P=0.001 for cardiovascular; and P=0.07 for respiratory mortality). Frequent exercise was not different from the reference (change in ER -0.8% to 1.7%, P=0.30 to 0.73). Conclusion: When compared with never or seldom exercise, exercising at low to moderate frequency is beneficial with lower influenza-associated mortality. © 2008 Wong et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshComorbidity-
dc.subject.meshExercise - physiology-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - complications - mortality - therapy-
dc.subject.meshLife Style-
dc.subject.meshPoisson Distribution-
dc.titleIs exercise protective against influenza-associated mortality?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM: hrmrwcm@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, HK: laihk@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY: syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailThach, TC: thach@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ: hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, HK=rp01527en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityThach, TC=rp00450en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0002108en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18461130-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2329855-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-47749126612en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros142425en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-47749126612&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee2108-
dc.identifier.epagee2108-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000261642400030-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectA mega-case-control study (20,000 deaths and 30,000 controls) on smoking and mortality in Hong Kong-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, HK=11739685900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOu, CQ=14070561800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KP=27171298000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThach, TC=6602850066en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, L=7406279703en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, YK=16300609300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK

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