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Article: Lower risk of tuberculosis in obesity

TitleLower risk of tuberculosis in obesity
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archinternmed.com
Citation
Archives Of Internal Medicine, 2007, v. 167 n. 12, p. 1297-1304 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Obesity is increasingly prevalent in both developed and developing areas. Although undernutrition is well associated with tuberculosis, few studies have systematically examined the association with obesity. Method: A cohort of 42 116 individuals 65 years or older enrolled at 18 health centers for elderly patients in Hong Kong, China (which has a tuberculosis incidence of approximately 90 per 100 000 population), in 2000 were followed up prospectively through the territory-wide tuberculosis registry for the development of active tuberculosis from 3 months after enrollment until December 31, 2005, using the identity card number as the unique identifier. The association with body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters), as categorized by the Asian standards, was assessed with the control of other baseline characteristics. Results: Obese (BMI ≥30) and overweight (BMI, 25 to <30) individuals were at significantly lower risks of developing active tuberculosis than normal-weight individuals (BMI, 18.5 to <25), with hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 0.36 (0.20-0.66) and 0.55 (0.44-0.70), respectively, after adjustment for baseline demographic, social, and clinical variables. An inverse linear association was observed predominantly for pulmonary but not extrapulmonary tuberculosis. This association persisted after controlling for potential confounders or excluding individuals with known tuberculosis risk factors. Conclusions: Obesity is associated with a lower risk of active pulmonary tuberculosis in the older population of Hong Kong. The presence of such a strong but selective association across the whole spectrum of BMI could have major biological, clinical, and/or epidemiological implications. Further studies are indicated to explore the underlying mechanisms, potential clinical utilities, and possible epidemiological consequences. ©2007 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86926
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 17.333
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYew, WWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, KSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChang, KCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:23:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:23:02Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Internal Medicine, 2007, v. 167 n. 12, p. 1297-1304en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0003-9926en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86926-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Obesity is increasingly prevalent in both developed and developing areas. Although undernutrition is well associated with tuberculosis, few studies have systematically examined the association with obesity. Method: A cohort of 42 116 individuals 65 years or older enrolled at 18 health centers for elderly patients in Hong Kong, China (which has a tuberculosis incidence of approximately 90 per 100 000 population), in 2000 were followed up prospectively through the territory-wide tuberculosis registry for the development of active tuberculosis from 3 months after enrollment until December 31, 2005, using the identity card number as the unique identifier. The association with body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters), as categorized by the Asian standards, was assessed with the control of other baseline characteristics. Results: Obese (BMI ≥30) and overweight (BMI, 25 to <30) individuals were at significantly lower risks of developing active tuberculosis than normal-weight individuals (BMI, 18.5 to <25), with hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 0.36 (0.20-0.66) and 0.55 (0.44-0.70), respectively, after adjustment for baseline demographic, social, and clinical variables. An inverse linear association was observed predominantly for pulmonary but not extrapulmonary tuberculosis. This association persisted after controlling for potential confounders or excluding individuals with known tuberculosis risk factors. Conclusions: Obesity is associated with a lower risk of active pulmonary tuberculosis in the older population of Hong Kong. The presence of such a strong but selective association across the whole spectrum of BMI could have major biological, clinical, and/or epidemiological implications. Further studies are indicated to explore the underlying mechanisms, potential clinical utilities, and possible epidemiological consequences. ©2007 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archinternmed.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Internal Medicineen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshObesity - complicationsen_HK
dc.subject.meshProportional Hazards Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rateen_HK
dc.subject.meshTuberculosis - complications - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.titleLower risk of tuberculosis in obesityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0003-9926&volume=167&spage=1297&epage=1304&date=2007&atitle=Lower+risk+of+tuberculosis+in+obesityen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, G:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, G=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/archinte.167.12.1297en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17592104en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34347251202en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros128569en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34347251202&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume167en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1297en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1304en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247474900012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, CC=7402612644en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, WM=7403914485en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYew, WW=7005934631en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, KS=7403581605en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, G=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, WS=7103147875en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, CM=7201442997en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CK=7404813960en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, KC=7404878870en_HK

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