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Article: Birth weight, infant growth, and childhood body mass index: Hong Kong's children of 1997 birth cohort

TitleBirth weight, infant growth, and childhood body mass index: Hong Kong's children of 1997 birth cohort
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archpediatrics.com
Citation
Archives Of Pediatrics And Adolescent Medicine, 2008, v. 162 n. 3, p. 212-218 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To investigate the association between birth weight, infant growth rate, and childhood adiposity as a proxy for adult metabolic or cardiovascular risk in a Chinese population with a history of recent and rapid economic development. Design: Prospective study in a population-representative birth cohort. Setting: Hong Kong Chinese population. Participants: Six thousand seventy-five term births (77.5% successful follow-up). Main Exposures: Birth weight and growth rate (change in the weight z score) at ages 0 to 3 and 3 to 12 months. Main Outcome Measure: Body mass index (BMI) (calculated as the weight in kilograms divided by the height in meters squared) z score at about age 7 years. Results: Each unit increase in the weight z score at ages 0 to 3 and 3 to 12 months increased the BMI z score by 0.52 and 0.33, respectively. Children in the highest birth weight and growth rate tertiles had the highest BMI z scores. In the lowest birth weight tertile, increases in the weight z score at ages 0 to 3 months had a larger effect on the BMI z score in boys (mean difference, 0.88; 95% confidence interval 0.69-1.07) than in girls (mean difference, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.71); these differences by birth weight, growth rate at ages 0 to 3 months, and sex were significant (P=.007). Conclusions: Faster prenatal and postnatal growth were associated with higher childhood BMI in a population with a recent history of rapid economic growth and relatively low birth weight, suggesting that maximal growth may not be optimal for metabolic risk. However, there may be a developmental trade-off between metabolic risk and other outcomes. ©2008 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86910
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 5.731
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, LLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMak, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:22:50Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:22:50Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Pediatrics And Adolescent Medicine, 2008, v. 162 n. 3, p. 212-218en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1072-4710en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86910-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate the association between birth weight, infant growth rate, and childhood adiposity as a proxy for adult metabolic or cardiovascular risk in a Chinese population with a history of recent and rapid economic development. Design: Prospective study in a population-representative birth cohort. Setting: Hong Kong Chinese population. Participants: Six thousand seventy-five term births (77.5% successful follow-up). Main Exposures: Birth weight and growth rate (change in the weight z score) at ages 0 to 3 and 3 to 12 months. Main Outcome Measure: Body mass index (BMI) (calculated as the weight in kilograms divided by the height in meters squared) z score at about age 7 years. Results: Each unit increase in the weight z score at ages 0 to 3 and 3 to 12 months increased the BMI z score by 0.52 and 0.33, respectively. Children in the highest birth weight and growth rate tertiles had the highest BMI z scores. In the lowest birth weight tertile, increases in the weight z score at ages 0 to 3 months had a larger effect on the BMI z score in boys (mean difference, 0.88; 95% confidence interval 0.69-1.07) than in girls (mean difference, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.71); these differences by birth weight, growth rate at ages 0 to 3 months, and sex were significant (P=.007). Conclusions: Faster prenatal and postnatal growth were associated with higher childhood BMI in a population with a recent history of rapid economic growth and relatively low birth weight, suggesting that maximal growth may not be optimal for metabolic risk. However, there may be a developmental trade-off between metabolic risk and other outcomes. ©2008 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archpediatrics.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicineen_HK
dc.subject.meshBirth Weighten_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild Developmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGestational Ageen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshObesity - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen_HK
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen_HK
dc.titleBirth weight, infant growth, and childhood body mass index: Hong Kong's children of 1997 birth cohorten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1072-4710&volume=162&spage=212&epage=218&date=2008&atitle=Birth+Weight,+Infant+Growth,+and+Childhood+Body+Mass+Index:+Hong+Kong%27s+Children+of+1997+Birth+Cohorten_HK
dc.identifier.emailHui, LL: huic@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM: lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHui, LL=rp01698en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/archpediatrics.2007.62en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18316657-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-40349106131en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros140843en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-40349106131&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume162en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage212en_HK
dc.identifier.epage218en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000253672100003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, LL=12774460100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, SSL=23969113700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, KH=8623141300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

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