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Article: Childhood migration and cardiovascular risk

TitleChildhood migration and cardiovascular risk
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
International Journal Of Epidemiology, 2004, v. 33 n. 6, p. 1219-1226 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Childhood living conditions have been hypothesized to be associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus in adult life. Methods. We analysed, using logistic regression, the risk of self-reported diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, and ischaemic heart disease in a population-based sample of 3643 Chinese men and 3778 Chinese women some of whom had experienced a change to more favourable economic conditions at different life stages through migration from mainland China to Hong Kong. Results. Adjusting for socio-economic status, risk behaviours, and family history, the development of diabetes was associated with migration from China to Hong Kong in the first two decades of life, albeit with a decreasing intensity of effect (OR = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.18, 3.45, OR = 1.84, 95% CI: 1.27, 2.66, and OR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.21, 2.45 for migration at ages 0-7, 8-17, and 18-24, respectively). The development of hypertension was mostly susceptible to environmental change during the growth spurt and puberty (migration at ages 8-17 OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.22, 1.99). The development of heart disease was associated with a sex-specific critical period in early childhood for men (migration at ages 0-7 OR = 3.17, 95% CI: 1.70, 5.91). Conclusion. Environmental change by migration throughout the first two decades of life can affect the development of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, and ischaemic heart disease, although adverse childhood conditions alone may not be a risk factor. Our results suggest that specific life course pathways may pre-dispose to these conditions and could be relevant to their aetiology in populations undergoing rapid development. © International Epidemiological Association 2004; all rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86892
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.522
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.381
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:22:37Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:22:37Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Epidemiology, 2004, v. 33 n. 6, p. 1219-1226en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-5771en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86892-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Childhood living conditions have been hypothesized to be associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus in adult life. Methods. We analysed, using logistic regression, the risk of self-reported diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, and ischaemic heart disease in a population-based sample of 3643 Chinese men and 3778 Chinese women some of whom had experienced a change to more favourable economic conditions at different life stages through migration from mainland China to Hong Kong. Results. Adjusting for socio-economic status, risk behaviours, and family history, the development of diabetes was associated with migration from China to Hong Kong in the first two decades of life, albeit with a decreasing intensity of effect (OR = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.18, 3.45, OR = 1.84, 95% CI: 1.27, 2.66, and OR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.21, 2.45 for migration at ages 0-7, 8-17, and 18-24, respectively). The development of hypertension was mostly susceptible to environmental change during the growth spurt and puberty (migration at ages 8-17 OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.22, 1.99). The development of heart disease was associated with a sex-specific critical period in early childhood for men (migration at ages 0-7 OR = 3.17, 95% CI: 1.70, 5.91). Conclusion. Environmental change by migration throughout the first two decades of life can affect the development of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, and ischaemic heart disease, although adverse childhood conditions alone may not be a risk factor. Our results suggest that specific life course pathways may pre-dispose to these conditions and could be relevant to their aetiology in populations undergoing rapid development. © International Epidemiological Association 2004; all rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Epidemiology. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshChina - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshEmigration and Immigrationen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshHyperlipidemias - epidemiology - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHypertension - epidemiology - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_HK
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshMyocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocial Environmenten_HK
dc.titleChildhood migration and cardiovascular risken_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0300-5771&volume=33&spage=1219&epage=1226&date=2004&atitle=Childhood+migration+and+cardiovascular+risken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, M:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY:syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, M=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ije/dyh221en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15567872-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-12344251876en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros96790en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-12344251876&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume33en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1219en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1226en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000226198800013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, M=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike75148-

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