File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Is self-efficacy a predictor of short-term post-surgical adjustment among Chinese women with breast cancer?

TitleIs self-efficacy a predictor of short-term post-surgical adjustment among Chinese women with breast cancer?
Authors
KeywordsBreast cancer
Expectancy-outcome incongruence
Psychosocial adjustment
Self-efficacy
Issue Date2007
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2007, v. 16 n. 7, p. 651-659 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: High self-efficacy (SE) is regarded as beneficial for cancer patients in facilitating adaptation and therefore desirable. However, this may not always be the case. Design: A longitudinal cohort study of women receiving breast cancer surgery. Path analysis examined impact of high and low baseline SE scores on outcome. Post hoc analysis stratified outcome expectations by SE. Methods: 405/529 eligible Chinese women aged 28-79 years receiving breast cancer surgery in six regional Hong Kong hospitals were interviewed within 1 week of surgery. After assessing SE, incongruence between expectancy and outcome of surgery (E-OI), and psychological morbidity, 91% of women were followed for 1 month when psychological and social morbidity were assessed (follow-up). Results: After adjustment for demographic and histopathological factors, psychological morbidity was predicted by E-OI. Women with high E-OI had more impairment of sexuality and self-image. Women with high SE had better self-image and relationships with friends, but tended to underestimate the negative consequences of surgery on appearance. This increased E-OI and thereby psychological morbidity. Conclusions: High post-surgical SE benefits early social adaptation, but also leads to under-estimating the negative impacts of surgery, impairing psychological adjustment. High SE can thereby contribute indirectly and significantly to increased psychological morbidity. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86876
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:22:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:22:24Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2007, v. 16 n. 7, p. 651-659en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86876-
dc.description.abstractBackground: High self-efficacy (SE) is regarded as beneficial for cancer patients in facilitating adaptation and therefore desirable. However, this may not always be the case. Design: A longitudinal cohort study of women receiving breast cancer surgery. Path analysis examined impact of high and low baseline SE scores on outcome. Post hoc analysis stratified outcome expectations by SE. Methods: 405/529 eligible Chinese women aged 28-79 years receiving breast cancer surgery in six regional Hong Kong hospitals were interviewed within 1 week of surgery. After assessing SE, incongruence between expectancy and outcome of surgery (E-OI), and psychological morbidity, 91% of women were followed for 1 month when psychological and social morbidity were assessed (follow-up). Results: After adjustment for demographic and histopathological factors, psychological morbidity was predicted by E-OI. Women with high E-OI had more impairment of sexuality and self-image. Women with high SE had better self-image and relationships with friends, but tended to underestimate the negative consequences of surgery on appearance. This increased E-OI and thereby psychological morbidity. Conclusions: High post-surgical SE benefits early social adaptation, but also leads to under-estimating the negative impacts of surgery, impairing psychological adjustment. High SE can thereby contribute indirectly and significantly to increased psychological morbidity. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_HK
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectBreast canceren_HK
dc.subjectExpectancy-outcome incongruenceen_HK
dc.subjectPsychosocial adjustmenten_HK
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychological-
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology-
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms - drug therapy - ethnology - psychology - surgery-
dc.subject.meshMastectomy - psychology-
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacy-
dc.titleIs self-efficacy a predictor of short-term post-surgical adjustment among Chinese women with breast cancer?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, WWT:wwtlam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WWT=rp00443en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.1116en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17083145-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34547553989en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros130074en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34547553989&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage651en_HK
dc.identifier.epage659en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248535200006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, WWT=7203022022en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats