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Article: Large-scale spatial-transmission models of infectious disease

TitleLarge-scale spatial-transmission models of infectious disease
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://sciencemag.org
Citation
Science, 2007, v. 316 n. 5829, p. 1298-1301 How to Cite?
AbstractDuring transmission of seasonal endemic diseases such as measles and influenza, spatial waves of infection have been observed between large distant populations. Also, during the initial stages of an outbreak of a new or reemerging pathogen, disease incidence tends to occur in spatial clusters, which makes containment possible if you can predict the subsequent spread of disease. Spatial models are being used with increasing frequency to help characterize these large-scale patterns and to evaluate the impact of interventions. Here, I review several recent studies on four diseases that show the benefits of different methodologies: measles (patch models), foot-and-mouth disease (distance-transmission models), pandemic influenza (multigroup models), and smallpox (network models). This review highlights the importance of the household in spatial studies of human diseases, such as smallpox and influenza. It also demonstrates the need to develop a simple model of household demographics, so that these large-scale models can be extended to the investigation of long-time scale human pathogens, such as tuberculosis and HIV.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86875
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 34.661
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 13.217
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRiley, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:22:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:22:24Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationScience, 2007, v. 316 n. 5829, p. 1298-1301en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0036-8075en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86875-
dc.description.abstractDuring transmission of seasonal endemic diseases such as measles and influenza, spatial waves of infection have been observed between large distant populations. Also, during the initial stages of an outbreak of a new or reemerging pathogen, disease incidence tends to occur in spatial clusters, which makes containment possible if you can predict the subsequent spread of disease. Spatial models are being used with increasing frequency to help characterize these large-scale patterns and to evaluate the impact of interventions. Here, I review several recent studies on four diseases that show the benefits of different methodologies: measles (patch models), foot-and-mouth disease (distance-transmission models), pandemic influenza (multigroup models), and smallpox (network models). This review highlights the importance of the household in spatial studies of human diseases, such as smallpox and influenza. It also demonstrates the need to develop a simple model of household demographics, so that these large-scale models can be extended to the investigation of long-time scale human pathogens, such as tuberculosis and HIV.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://sciencemag.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofScienceen_HK
dc.rightsScience. Copyright © American Association for the Advancement of Science.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCommunicable Disease Controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshCommunicable Diseases - epidemiology - transmissionen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Transmission, Infectiousen_HK
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristicsen_HK
dc.subject.meshFoot-and-Mouth Disease - epidemiology - transmissionen_HK
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - transmissionen_HK
dc.subject.meshMeasles - epidemiology - transmissionen_HK
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen_HK
dc.subject.meshSmallpox - epidemiology - transmissionen_HK
dc.titleLarge-scale spatial-transmission models of infectious diseaseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0036-8075&volume=316&spage=1298&epage=1301&date=2007&atitle=Large-scale+spatial-transmission+models+of+infectious+diseaseen_HK
dc.identifier.emailRiley, S:sriley@hkucc.hku.hk, steven.riley@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityRiley, S=rp00511en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/science.1134695en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17540894-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34249883600en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros127803en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34249883600&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume316en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5829en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1298en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1301en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000246885600039-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.f1000717978480-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRiley, S=7102619416en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1362884-

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