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Article: Multi-host transmission dynamics of Schistosoma japonicum in Samar Province, the Philippines

TitleMulti-host transmission dynamics of Schistosoma japonicum in Samar Province, the Philippines
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://medicine.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=index-html&issn=1549-1676
Citation
Plos Medicine, 2008, v. 5 n. 1, p. 0070-0078 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Among the 6.7 million people living in areas of the Philippines where infection with Schistosoma japonicum is considered endemic, even within small geographical areas levels of infection vary considerably. In general, the ecological drivers of this variability are not well described. Unlike other schistosomes, S. japonicum is known to infect several mammalian hosts. However, the relative contribution of different hosts to the transmission cycle is not well understood. Here, we characterize the transmission dynamics of S. japonicum using data from an extensive field study and a mathematical transmission model. Methods and Findings: In this study, stool samples were obtained from 5,623 humans and 5,899 potential nonhuman mammalian hosts in 50 villages in the Province of Samar, the Philippines. These data, with variable numbers of samples per individual, were adjusted for known specificities and sensitivities of the measurement techniques before being used to estimate the parameters of a mathematical transmission model, under the assumption that the dynamic transmission processes of infection and recovery were in a steady state in each village. The model was structured to allow variable rates of transmission from different mammals (humans, dogs, cats, pigs, domesticated water buffalo, and rats) to snails and from snails to mammals. First, we held transmission parameters constant for all villages and found that no combination of mammalian population size and prevalence of infectivity could explain the observed variability in prevalence of infection between villages. We then allowed either the underlying rate of transmission (a) from snails to mammals or (b) from mammals to snails to vary by village. Our data provided substantially more support for model structure (a) than for model structure (b). Fitted values for the village-level transmission intensity from snails to mammals appeared to be strongly spatially correlated, which is consistent with results from descriptive hierarchical analyses. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the process of acquiring mammalian S. japonicum infection is more important in explaining differences in prevalence of infection between villages than the process of snails becoming infected. Also, the contribution from water buffaloes to human S. japonicum infection in the Philippines is less important than has been recently observed for bovines in China. These findings have implications for the prioritization of mitigating interventions against S. japonicum transmission. © 2008 Riley et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86853
ISSN
2011 Impact Factor: 16.269
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.667
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRiley, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCarabin, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBélisle, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJoseph, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorTallo, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorBalolong, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorWillingham III, ALen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFernandez Jr, TJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorO'Neal Gonzales, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorOlveda, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcGarvey, STen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:22:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:22:08Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos Medicine, 2008, v. 5 n. 1, p. 0070-0078en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1549-1277en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86853-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Among the 6.7 million people living in areas of the Philippines where infection with Schistosoma japonicum is considered endemic, even within small geographical areas levels of infection vary considerably. In general, the ecological drivers of this variability are not well described. Unlike other schistosomes, S. japonicum is known to infect several mammalian hosts. However, the relative contribution of different hosts to the transmission cycle is not well understood. Here, we characterize the transmission dynamics of S. japonicum using data from an extensive field study and a mathematical transmission model. Methods and Findings: In this study, stool samples were obtained from 5,623 humans and 5,899 potential nonhuman mammalian hosts in 50 villages in the Province of Samar, the Philippines. These data, with variable numbers of samples per individual, were adjusted for known specificities and sensitivities of the measurement techniques before being used to estimate the parameters of a mathematical transmission model, under the assumption that the dynamic transmission processes of infection and recovery were in a steady state in each village. The model was structured to allow variable rates of transmission from different mammals (humans, dogs, cats, pigs, domesticated water buffalo, and rats) to snails and from snails to mammals. First, we held transmission parameters constant for all villages and found that no combination of mammalian population size and prevalence of infectivity could explain the observed variability in prevalence of infection between villages. We then allowed either the underlying rate of transmission (a) from snails to mammals or (b) from mammals to snails to vary by village. Our data provided substantially more support for model structure (a) than for model structure (b). Fitted values for the village-level transmission intensity from snails to mammals appeared to be strongly spatially correlated, which is consistent with results from descriptive hierarchical analyses. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the process of acquiring mammalian S. japonicum infection is more important in explaining differences in prevalence of infection between villages than the process of snails becoming infected. Also, the contribution from water buffaloes to human S. japonicum infection in the Philippines is less important than has been recently observed for bovines in China. These findings have implications for the prioritization of mitigating interventions against S. japonicum transmission. © 2008 Riley et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://medicine.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=index-html&issn=1549-1676en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshEndemic Diseases-
dc.subject.meshFresh Water - parasitology-
dc.subject.meshModels, Theoretical-
dc.subject.meshPhilippines - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshSchistosomiasis japonica - epidemiology - prevention and control - transmission - veterinary-
dc.titleMulti-host transmission dynamics of Schistosoma japonicum in Samar Province, the Philippinesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailRiley, S:sriley@hkucc.hku.hk, steven.riley@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityRiley, S=rp00511en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pmed.0050018en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18215106-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2211559-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38849200255en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros142696en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-38849200255&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage0070en_HK
dc.identifier.epage0078en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000254928700015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRiley, S=7102619416en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCarabin, H=7003743787en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBélisle, P=6601973587en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJoseph, L=7103166124en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTallo, V=12800194400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBalolong, E=9636314600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWillingham III, AL=7004525128en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFernandez Jr, TJ=23485133700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridO'Neal Gonzales, R=23486394800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOlveda, R=6701313494en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGarvey, ST=7006300581en_HK

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