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Article: Estimating variability in the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome to household contacts in Hong Kong, China

TitleEstimating variability in the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome to household contacts in Hong Kong, China
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Epidemiology, 2007, v. 166 n. 3, p. 355-363 How to Cite?
AbstractThe extensive data collection and contact tracing that occurred during the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Hong Kong, China, allowed the authors to examine how the probability of transmission varied from the date of symptom onset to the date of hospitalization for household contacts of SARS patients. Using a discrete-time likelihood model, the authors estimated the transmission probability per contact for each day following the onset of symptoms. The results suggested that there may be two peaks in the probability of SARS transmission, the first occurring around day 2 after symptom onset and the second occurring approximately 10 days after symptom onset. Index patients who were aged 60 years or older or whose lactate dehydrogenase level was elevated upon admission to the hospital (indicating higher viral loads) were more likely to transmit SARS to their contacts. There was little variation in the daily transmission probabilities before versus after the introduction of public health interventions on or around March 26, 2003. This study suggests that the probability of transmission of SARS is dependent upon characteristics of the index patients and does not simply reflect temporal variability in the viral load of SARS cases. © The Author 2007. Published by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86847
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.036
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.047
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPitzer, VEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLipsitch, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:22:03Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:22:03Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Epidemiology, 2007, v. 166 n. 3, p. 355-363en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86847-
dc.description.abstractThe extensive data collection and contact tracing that occurred during the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Hong Kong, China, allowed the authors to examine how the probability of transmission varied from the date of symptom onset to the date of hospitalization for household contacts of SARS patients. Using a discrete-time likelihood model, the authors estimated the transmission probability per contact for each day following the onset of symptoms. The results suggested that there may be two peaks in the probability of SARS transmission, the first occurring around day 2 after symptom onset and the second occurring approximately 10 days after symptom onset. Index patients who were aged 60 years or older or whose lactate dehydrogenase level was elevated upon admission to the hospital (indicating higher viral loads) were more likely to transmit SARS to their contacts. There was little variation in the daily transmission probabilities before versus after the introduction of public health interventions on or around March 26, 2003. This study suggests that the probability of transmission of SARS is dependent upon characteristics of the index patients and does not simply reflect temporal variability in the viral load of SARS cases. © The Author 2007. Published by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsAmerican Journal of Epidemiology. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Transmission, Infectious - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristicsen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshL-Lactate Dehydrogenase - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshModels, Statisticalen_HK
dc.subject.meshProbabilityen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology - transmissionen_HK
dc.titleEstimating variability in the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome to household contacts in Hong Kong, Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0002-9262&volume=166&spage=355&epage=363&date=2007&atitle=Estimating+variability+in+the+transmission+of+severe+acute+respiratory+syndrome+to+household+contacts+in+Hong+Kong,+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwm082en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17493952-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34547670099en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros134141en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34547670099&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume166en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage355en_HK
dc.identifier.epage363en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248374500016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPitzer, VE=34572310000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLipsitch, M=7006236353en_HK

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