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Article: Evaluation of a handheld clinical decision support tool for evidence-based learning and practice in medical undergraduates

TitleEvaluation of a handheld clinical decision support tool for evidence-based learning and practice in medical undergraduates
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110
Citation
Medical Education, 2004, v. 38 n. 6, p. 628-637 How to Cite?
AbstractINTRODUCTION: Handheld computers (PDAs) uploaded with clinical decision support software (CDSS) have the potential to facilitate the adoption of evidence-based medicine (EBM) at the point-of-care among undergraduate medical students. Further evaluation of the usefulness and acceptability of these tools is required. METHODS: All 169 Year 4 undergraduate medical students at the University of Hong Kong completed a post-randomised controlled trial survey. Primary outcome measures were CDSS/PDA usefulness, satisfaction, functionality and utilisation. Focus groups were also conducted to derive complementary qualitative data on the students' attitudes towards using such new technology. RESULTS: Overall, the students found the CDSS/PDA useful (mean score = 3.90 out of 6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.78, 4.03). They were less satisfied with the functional features of the CDSS (mean score = 3.45, 95% CI = 3.32, 3.59) and the PDA (mean score = 3.51 95% CI = 3.40, 3.62). Utilisation was low, with the average frequency of use less than once per week. Although students reported a need for information in patient care at least once daily, they infrequently used the CDSS in a clinical setting (20.4 ± 10.4% of the time), with an average information retrieval success rate of 37.6 ± 22.1% requiring 63.7 ± 86.1 seconds. Multivariable regression shows that higher perceived CDSS/PDA usefulness was associated with more supportive faculty attitudes, greater knowledge of EBM, better computer literacy skills and increased use in a clinical setting. Greater satisfaction with the CDSS/PDA was associated with increased use in a clinical setting and higher successful search rates. Qualitative results were consistent with these quantitative findings and yielded additional information on students' underlying feelings that may explain the observations. CONCLUSIONS: While PDAs uploaded with the CDSS are able to provide students with better access to high quality information, improvements in faculty attitudes, students' knowledge of EBM and computer literacy skills, and having the CDSS specially designed for undergraduate use are essential to increasing student adoption of such point-of-care tools.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86819
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.369
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.913
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTin, KYKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:21:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:21:42Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMedical Education, 2004, v. 38 n. 6, p. 628-637en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0308-0110en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86819-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Handheld computers (PDAs) uploaded with clinical decision support software (CDSS) have the potential to facilitate the adoption of evidence-based medicine (EBM) at the point-of-care among undergraduate medical students. Further evaluation of the usefulness and acceptability of these tools is required. METHODS: All 169 Year 4 undergraduate medical students at the University of Hong Kong completed a post-randomised controlled trial survey. Primary outcome measures were CDSS/PDA usefulness, satisfaction, functionality and utilisation. Focus groups were also conducted to derive complementary qualitative data on the students' attitudes towards using such new technology. RESULTS: Overall, the students found the CDSS/PDA useful (mean score = 3.90 out of 6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.78, 4.03). They were less satisfied with the functional features of the CDSS (mean score = 3.45, 95% CI = 3.32, 3.59) and the PDA (mean score = 3.51 95% CI = 3.40, 3.62). Utilisation was low, with the average frequency of use less than once per week. Although students reported a need for information in patient care at least once daily, they infrequently used the CDSS in a clinical setting (20.4 ± 10.4% of the time), with an average information retrieval success rate of 37.6 ± 22.1% requiring 63.7 ± 86.1 seconds. Multivariable regression shows that higher perceived CDSS/PDA usefulness was associated with more supportive faculty attitudes, greater knowledge of EBM, better computer literacy skills and increased use in a clinical setting. Greater satisfaction with the CDSS/PDA was associated with increased use in a clinical setting and higher successful search rates. Qualitative results were consistent with these quantitative findings and yielded additional information on students' underlying feelings that may explain the observations. CONCLUSIONS: While PDAs uploaded with the CDSS are able to provide students with better access to high quality information, improvements in faculty attitudes, students' knowledge of EBM and computer literacy skills, and having the CDSS specially designed for undergraduate use are essential to increasing student adoption of such point-of-care tools.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Educationen_HK
dc.rightsMedical Education. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnelen_HK
dc.subject.meshComputers, Handheld - trendsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshDecision Support Systems, Clinical - instrumentationen_HK
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Undergraduate - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshEvidence-Based Medicine - educationen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medical - psychologyen_HK
dc.titleEvaluation of a handheld clinical decision support tool for evidence-based learning and practice in medical undergraduatesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0308-0110&volume=38&spage=628&epage=637&date=2004&atitle=Evaluation+of+a+handheld+clinical+decision+support+tool+for+evidence-based+learning+and+practice+in+medical+undergraduatesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJohnston, JM:jjohnsto@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTin, KYK:tinyiuke@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM:lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, W:wwtlam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJohnston, JM=rp00375en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTin, KYK=rp00494en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, W=rp00443en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2929.2004.01842.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15189259-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-3042586772en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros87880en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-3042586772&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage628en_HK
dc.identifier.epage637en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000221738200009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohnston, JM=7403397964en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTin, KYK=7003796897en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, W=7203022022en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike265798-

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