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Article: Stress and vulnerability in medical students

TitleStress and vulnerability in medical students
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110
Citation
Medical Education, 1995, v. 29 n. 2, p. 119-127 How to Cite?
AbstractOne hundred and forty Hong Kong Chinese students were surveyed early in the second year of their medical education (year 2), and compared with 138 students surveyed prior to beginning their first year of medical school and with 74 non-medical university students in their second year. In year 2 students, distress as reflected in their scores on anxiety and depression self-report scales was high, and these students reported greater utilization of health professional services as compared with the other two groups. In year 2 students, concerns related to the medical school environment and curriculum, and whether one has the endurance and ability to be successful were significant correlates with depression and anxiety. Loss of opportunity to maintain social and recreational sources of gratification correlated with anxiety. There was no difference between the sexes with regard to the development of anxiety and depression symptoms. Academically less successful students reported somewhat higher levels of depressive ideation and symptomatology. Trait anxiety correlated with the development of distress, while optimism protected against the development of distress. Active coping styles and positive reinterpretation as a coping strategy correlated negatively with distress, while wishful thinking correlated positively with distress. These findings emphasize the need for greater attention to the psychological well-being of doctors-in-training, in Hong Kong as in the Western world. These findings should be further explored in longitudinal studies, and may be helpful in designing intervention and support programmes for vulnerable students.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86808
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.369
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.913
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStewart, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBetson, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Ien_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, PWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:21:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:21:35Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMedical Education, 1995, v. 29 n. 2, p. 119-127en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0308-0110en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86808-
dc.description.abstractOne hundred and forty Hong Kong Chinese students were surveyed early in the second year of their medical education (year 2), and compared with 138 students surveyed prior to beginning their first year of medical school and with 74 non-medical university students in their second year. In year 2 students, distress as reflected in their scores on anxiety and depression self-report scales was high, and these students reported greater utilization of health professional services as compared with the other two groups. In year 2 students, concerns related to the medical school environment and curriculum, and whether one has the endurance and ability to be successful were significant correlates with depression and anxiety. Loss of opportunity to maintain social and recreational sources of gratification correlated with anxiety. There was no difference between the sexes with regard to the development of anxiety and depression symptoms. Academically less successful students reported somewhat higher levels of depressive ideation and symptomatology. Trait anxiety correlated with the development of distress, while optimism protected against the development of distress. Active coping styles and positive reinterpretation as a coping strategy correlated negatively with distress, while wishful thinking correlated positively with distress. These findings emphasize the need for greater attention to the psychological well-being of doctors-in-training, in Hong Kong as in the Western world. These findings should be further explored in longitudinal studies, and may be helpful in designing intervention and support programmes for vulnerable students.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Educationen_HK
dc.rightsMedical Education. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAnxiety - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChina - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDepression - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychologicalen_HK
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medical - psychologyen_HK
dc.titleStress and vulnerability in medical studentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0308-0110&volume=29&spage=119&epage=127&date=1995&atitle=Stress+and+vulnerability+in+medical+studentsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM:hrmrwcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid7623698-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029018506en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros1547en_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage119en_HK
dc.identifier.epage127en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995QZ48300005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStewart, SM=35460013800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBetson, C=6602173411en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarshall, I=7202159128en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, PWH=7406120357en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK

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