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Article: Influence of educational level and marital status on dietary intake, obesity and other cardiovascular risk factors in a Hong Kong Chinese population

TitleInfluence of educational level and marital status on dietary intake, obesity and other cardiovascular risk factors in a Hong Kong Chinese population
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ejcn
Citation
European Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 1999, v. 53 n. 6, p. 461-467 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To examine the influence of education and marital status on dietary intake, body mass index, waist hip ratio, blood pressure, fasting and 2 h glucose, and lipid profile in adult Hong Kong Chinese. Design: Randomized age and sex stratified survery. Subjects: One thousand and ten subjects aged 25-74 y (500 men, 510 women) recruited for the 1995-96 Hong Kong Dietary and Cardiovascular Risk Prevalence Survey. Measurements: Dietary intake was estimated using a food frequency method. Information on education level and marital status was included in the questionnaire. Anthropometry and biochemical parameters were measured using standard methods. Results: After adjustment for age, higher levels of education are associated with higher percentage protein intake in men, higher percentage fat intake in women, higher nutrient density of fibre and calcium in both men and women, and higher nutrient density of protein, fat, niacin, vitamin D, and polyunsaturated fatty acid in women. Consumption of fruits was also higher in women, and that of dairy products higher in men. Body mass index and waist-hip ratio were lower with increasing levels of education in women, while lower mean systolic BP was observed in men. Single women had lower nutrient densities of vitamin D and iron, and lower consumption of vegetables and fish, compared with married women. Body mass index was lower in both single men and women. Single men had a better cardiovascular risk factor profile, in that diastolic BP, triglycerides and cholesterol/HDL ratio were lower, in addition to a lower body mass index. Conclusion: Higher education level is associated with a healthier diet and lower prevalence of overweight.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86797
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.935
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.488
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SSFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSham, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:21:26Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:21:26Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 1999, v. 53 n. 6, p. 461-467en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0954-3007en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86797-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To examine the influence of education and marital status on dietary intake, body mass index, waist hip ratio, blood pressure, fasting and 2 h glucose, and lipid profile in adult Hong Kong Chinese. Design: Randomized age and sex stratified survery. Subjects: One thousand and ten subjects aged 25-74 y (500 men, 510 women) recruited for the 1995-96 Hong Kong Dietary and Cardiovascular Risk Prevalence Survey. Measurements: Dietary intake was estimated using a food frequency method. Information on education level and marital status was included in the questionnaire. Anthropometry and biochemical parameters were measured using standard methods. Results: After adjustment for age, higher levels of education are associated with higher percentage protein intake in men, higher percentage fat intake in women, higher nutrient density of fibre and calcium in both men and women, and higher nutrient density of protein, fat, niacin, vitamin D, and polyunsaturated fatty acid in women. Consumption of fruits was also higher in women, and that of dairy products higher in men. Body mass index and waist-hip ratio were lower with increasing levels of education in women, while lower mean systolic BP was observed in men. Single women had lower nutrient densities of vitamin D and iron, and lower consumption of vegetables and fish, compared with married women. Body mass index was lower in both single men and women. Single men had a better cardiovascular risk factor profile, in that diastolic BP, triglycerides and cholesterol/HDL ratio were lower, in addition to a lower body mass index. Conclusion: Higher education level is associated with a healthier diet and lower prevalence of overweight.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ejcnen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutritionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucoseen_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressureen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Constitutionen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDieten_HK
dc.subject.meshDiet Surveysen_HK
dc.subject.meshEducational Statusen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMarital Statusen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshObesity - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_HK
dc.subject.meshRandom Allocationen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_HK
dc.titleInfluence of educational level and marital status on dietary intake, obesity and other cardiovascular risk factors in a Hong Kong Chinese populationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0954-3007&volume=53&spage=461&epage=467&date=1999&atitle=Influence+of+educational+level+and+marital+status+on+dietary+intake,+obesity+and+other+cardiovascular+risk+factors+in+a+Hong+Kong+Chinese+populationen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid10403582-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033059786en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros40939en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033059786&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume53en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage461en_HK
dc.identifier.epage467en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000080828000007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, J=36040369400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, SSF=7202044842en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SC=7403716908en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, A=7004122137en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK

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