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Article: Secondhand smoke exposure, smoking hygiene, and hospitalization in the first 18 months of life

TitleSecondhand smoke exposure, smoking hygiene, and hospitalization in the first 18 months of life
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archpediatrics.com
Citation
Archives Of Pediatrics And Adolescent Medicine, 2004, v. 158 n. 7, p. 687-693 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Recognizing the suboptimal public health effects of a complete cessation strategy for parents and child caregivers who smoke, some researchers have called for a harm reduction approach; however, the evidence remains scanty and controversial. Objective: To examine the effects of secondhand smoke and smoking hygiene on infant health and related health care costs during the first 18 months of life. Methods: We conducted prospective follow-up on 8327 newborns during April and May of 1997 for 18 months in a population-based birth cohort of infants from Hong Kong, China. Main Outcome Measures: Number of hospital admissions, adjusted odds ratios for ever hospitalization for each secondhand smoke exposure variable, and corresponding population attributable risks. Results: Most secondhand smoke exposure came from fathers and other household contacts, whereas only 2.8% of mothers smoked postpartum. The odds ratio of ever hospitalization due to all illnesses combined for infants living in a household with any (maternal, paternal, or other) smoker who was smoking at least 3 m away from the infant, as reported by a parent, was 1.00 (95% confidence interval, 0.88-1.13) compared with those in a smoke-free household. The corresponding odds ratio for infants living with any smoker at home with poor smoking hygiene (<3 m away) was 1.28 (95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.52), which translated into 2.8% of all inpatient episodes in the first year of life, representing an additional 616 admissions. Conclusions: Hospital admission was significantly more likely among infants exposed to secondhand smoke if it was accompanied by poor smoking hygiene. Harm reduction strategies should be rigorously adhered to when complete cessation is not possible.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86779
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 5.731
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:21:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:21:13Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Pediatrics And Adolescent Medicine, 2004, v. 158 n. 7, p. 687-693en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1072-4710en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86779-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Recognizing the suboptimal public health effects of a complete cessation strategy for parents and child caregivers who smoke, some researchers have called for a harm reduction approach; however, the evidence remains scanty and controversial. Objective: To examine the effects of secondhand smoke and smoking hygiene on infant health and related health care costs during the first 18 months of life. Methods: We conducted prospective follow-up on 8327 newborns during April and May of 1997 for 18 months in a population-based birth cohort of infants from Hong Kong, China. Main Outcome Measures: Number of hospital admissions, adjusted odds ratios for ever hospitalization for each secondhand smoke exposure variable, and corresponding population attributable risks. Results: Most secondhand smoke exposure came from fathers and other household contacts, whereas only 2.8% of mothers smoked postpartum. The odds ratio of ever hospitalization due to all illnesses combined for infants living in a household with any (maternal, paternal, or other) smoker who was smoking at least 3 m away from the infant, as reported by a parent, was 1.00 (95% confidence interval, 0.88-1.13) compared with those in a smoke-free household. The corresponding odds ratio for infants living with any smoker at home with poor smoking hygiene (<3 m away) was 1.28 (95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.52), which translated into 2.8% of all inpatient episodes in the first year of life, representing an additional 616 admissions. Conclusions: Hospital admission was significantly more likely among infants exposed to secondhand smoke if it was accompanied by poor smoking hygiene. Harm reduction strategies should be rigorously adhered to when complete cessation is not possible.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archpediatrics.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicineen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Healthen_HK
dc.subject.meshConfidence Intervalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCounseling - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshFamilyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHospitalization - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshHygiene - education - standardsen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshInfant Welfare - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMothers - education - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen_HK
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Exposure Delayed Effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSmoking - adverse effects - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.titleSecondhand smoke exposure, smoking hygiene, and hospitalization in the first 18 months of lifeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1072-4710&volume=158&spage=687&epage=693&date=2004&atitle=Secondhand+smoke+exposure,+smoking+hygiene,+and+hospitalization+in+the+first+18+months+of+lifeen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM:lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/archpedi.158.7.687en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15237069-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-3042785068en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros95462en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-3042785068&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume158en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage687en_HK
dc.identifier.epage693en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000222569200013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK

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