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Article: Environmental tobacco smoke exposure among police officers in Hong Kong

TitleEnvironmental tobacco smoke exposure among police officers in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://jama.ama-assn.org/index.dtl
Citation
Journal Of The American Medical Association, 2000, v. 284 n. 6, p. 756-763 How to Cite?
AbstractContext: Few epidemiological studies have examined the relationship between chronic respiratory symptoms and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) at work in adults, and none have shown clear dose-response relationships. Objective: To examine the respiratory effects of ETS exposure at home and at work among never-smoking adults. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cross-sectional, self-administered questionnaire survey conducted in December 1995 and January 1996 among 4468 male and 728 female police officers in Hong Kong who were never-smokers. Main Outcome Measures: Respiratory symptoms and physician consultation in the previous 14 days for such symptoms by presence and amount of ETS exposure at work. Results: Eighty percent of both men and women reported ETS exposure at work. Significant odds ratios (ORs) for respiratory symptoms were found among men with ETS exposure at work (for any respiratory symptoms, difference in absolute rate, 20.4%; OR, 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.97-2.75; attributable risk, 57%) and physician consultation (difference in absolute rate, 4.5%; OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.05-1.61; attributable risk, 23%). Trends were similar among women for any respiratory symptoms (difference in absolute rate, 15.4%; OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.04-2.56; attributable risk, 39%) and for physician consultation (difference in absolute rates, 2.8%; OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.87-2.41; attributable risk, 31%). Positive dose-response relationships with number of coworkers smoking nearby and amount of ETS exposure in the work place were found. Conclusions: This study provides further evidence of the serious health hazards associated with ETS exposure at work. The findings support a ban on smoking in the workplace to protect all workers in both developed and developing countries.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86767
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 37.684
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.440
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAdab, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcGhee, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAharonsonDaniel, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:21:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:21:04Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American Medical Association, 2000, v. 284 n. 6, p. 756-763en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0098-7484en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86767-
dc.description.abstractContext: Few epidemiological studies have examined the relationship between chronic respiratory symptoms and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) at work in adults, and none have shown clear dose-response relationships. Objective: To examine the respiratory effects of ETS exposure at home and at work among never-smoking adults. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cross-sectional, self-administered questionnaire survey conducted in December 1995 and January 1996 among 4468 male and 728 female police officers in Hong Kong who were never-smokers. Main Outcome Measures: Respiratory symptoms and physician consultation in the previous 14 days for such symptoms by presence and amount of ETS exposure at work. Results: Eighty percent of both men and women reported ETS exposure at work. Significant odds ratios (ORs) for respiratory symptoms were found among men with ETS exposure at work (for any respiratory symptoms, difference in absolute rate, 20.4%; OR, 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.97-2.75; attributable risk, 57%) and physician consultation (difference in absolute rate, 4.5%; OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.05-1.61; attributable risk, 23%). Trends were similar among women for any respiratory symptoms (difference in absolute rate, 15.4%; OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.04-2.56; attributable risk, 39%) and for physician consultation (difference in absolute rates, 2.8%; OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.87-2.41; attributable risk, 31%). Positive dose-response relationships with number of coworkers smoking nearby and amount of ETS exposure in the work place were found. Conclusions: This study provides further evidence of the serious health hazards associated with ETS exposure at work. The findings support a ban on smoking in the workplace to protect all workers in both developed and developing countries.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://jama.ama-assn.org/index.dtlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Medical Associationen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristicsen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshPoliceen_HK
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_HK
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshWorkplaceen_HK
dc.titleEnvironmental tobacco smoke exposure among police officers in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0098-7484&volume=284&spage=756&epage=763&date=2000&atitle=Environmental+tobacco+smoke+exposure+among+police+officers+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM:lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcGhee, SM:smmcghee@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcGhee, SM=rp00393en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid10927788-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034625881en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros51632en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034625881&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume284en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage756en_HK
dc.identifier.epage763en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000088587300038-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAdab, P=6601949045en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGhee, SM=7003288588en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAharonsonDaniel, L=6603640538en_HK

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