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Article: Health care utilization as a function of subjective health status, job satisfaction and gender among health care workers in Guangzhou, Southern China

TitleHealth care utilization as a function of subjective health status, job satisfaction and gender among health care workers in Guangzhou, Southern China
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/socscimed
Citation
Social Science And Medicine, 1995, v. 41 n. 8, p. 1103-1110 How to Cite?
AbstractJob satisfaction, subjective health and health care utilization was studied on 72 doctors and 127 nurses working at two hospitals in Guangzhou in the People's Republic of China (P.R.C.), along with medication use and consultations with physicians over the 14 days preceding data collection. Female doctors were, on average, ten years older than male doctors. Nurses (all female) were comparable to male doctors in terms of age. Current and general subjective health, and job satisfaction differed between doctors and nurses. Nurses were less satisfied than doctors and reported poorer perceived health, until gender and age were controlled. Female doctors had poorer ratings of general and current subjective health and lower job satisfaction than their male colleagues. Path analysis tested whether lower job satisfaction leads to decrements in perceived current health which in turn increased consultation with a physician and medication use. When male and female subjects were examined separately, job satisfaction was inversely related to consultation behaviour among males and positively related to perceived current health in both genders. Among females job satisfaction and consultation behaviour related to current perceived health but were not related to each other. The hypothesized path was upheld for nurses. Lack of power prevented the same path being significant for male or female doctors. In combination, doctors showed significant relationships between the four main variables studied.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86729
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.814
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.894
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, YEen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:20:36Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:20:36Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSocial Science And Medicine, 1995, v. 41 n. 8, p. 1103-1110en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86729-
dc.description.abstractJob satisfaction, subjective health and health care utilization was studied on 72 doctors and 127 nurses working at two hospitals in Guangzhou in the People's Republic of China (P.R.C.), along with medication use and consultations with physicians over the 14 days preceding data collection. Female doctors were, on average, ten years older than male doctors. Nurses (all female) were comparable to male doctors in terms of age. Current and general subjective health, and job satisfaction differed between doctors and nurses. Nurses were less satisfied than doctors and reported poorer perceived health, until gender and age were controlled. Female doctors had poorer ratings of general and current subjective health and lower job satisfaction than their male colleagues. Path analysis tested whether lower job satisfaction leads to decrements in perceived current health which in turn increased consultation with a physician and medication use. When male and female subjects were examined separately, job satisfaction was inversely related to consultation behaviour among males and positively related to perceived current health in both genders. Among females job satisfaction and consultation behaviour related to current perceived health but were not related to each other. The hypothesized path was upheld for nurses. Lack of power prevented the same path being significant for male or female doctors. In combination, doctors showed significant relationships between the four main variables studied.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/socscimeden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Science and Medicineen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Healthen_HK
dc.subject.meshChinaen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Cultural Comparisonen_HK
dc.subject.meshDeveloping Countriesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGender Identityen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Personnel - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshJob Satisfactionen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshNurses - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshPatient Care Team - utilizationen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhysicians - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshReferral and Consultation - utilizationen_HK
dc.titleHealth care utilization as a function of subjective health status, job satisfaction and gender among health care workers in Guangzhou, Southern Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0277-9536&volume=41&issue=8&spage=1103&epage=1110&date=1995&atitle=Health+care+utilization+as+a+function+of+subjective+health+status,+job+satisfaction+and+gender+among+health+care+workers+in+Guangzhou,+southern+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0277-9536(94)00418-Sen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid8578333en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029150239en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros8917en_HK
dc.identifier.volume41en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1103en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1110en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995RV98700009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, J=36063573400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, YE=16167830800en_HK

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