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Article: Risk-stratified seroprevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus among children in Hong Kong

TitleRisk-stratified seroprevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus among children in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsChildren
SARS
SARS-coronavirus seroprevalence
Severe acute respiratory syndrome
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. The Journal's web site is located at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/
Citation
Pediatrics, 2006, v. 117 n. 6, p. e1156-e1162 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND. Severe acute respiratory syndrome was relatively mild in children, and the incidence was significantly lower when compared with adults. Although previous seroepidemiological studies demonstrated that asymptomatic infection was uncommon among health care workers and adult contacts of patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome, it is unclear whether this would extend to the pediatric population. OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus among asymptomatic children living near Amoy Gardens (site of largest community outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong) compared with a low-risk region where no community transmission occurred. METHODS. The study was conducted from September to October 2003. Target subjects living in the defined high-risk and low-risk areas were approached through the schools within the respective localities. We recruited 353 and 361 children, respectively, from the high-risk and low-risk areas and collected 3 to 5 mL of blood for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus IgG antibody testing by immunofluorescence antibody assay and confirmation by neutralization test. Parents of all of the subjects who joined the study were contacted by telephone, and a standardized questionnaire was administered by a research nurse to collect information including sociodemographic data, history of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in the subjects and members of the household, history of contact with known cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome, presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome-like symptoms since onset of the severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic, travel history of the child and his/her relatives within the 15 days before any such symptom onset, use of health service as a result of such symptoms, and whether there were deaths of relatives as a result of severe acute respiratory syndrome. RESULTS. Two (0.57%) of 353 asymptomatic children from the high-risk area were tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus antibody compared with 0 of 361 in the low-risk region. None of the 14 children who lived in the high-risk area and had known contacts with severe acute respiratory syndrome patients were seropositive. CONCLUSIONS. As in adults, subclinical severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection was rare in children in the 2003 epidemic. The very low seroprevalence implies little or no population herd immunity to protect against future resurgence of severe acute respiratory syndrome. Copyright © 2006 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86724
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.196
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.226
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, PPWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, WHSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiu, SSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, YLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:20:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:20:33Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatrics, 2006, v. 117 n. 6, p. e1156-e1162en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0031-4005en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86724-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND. Severe acute respiratory syndrome was relatively mild in children, and the incidence was significantly lower when compared with adults. Although previous seroepidemiological studies demonstrated that asymptomatic infection was uncommon among health care workers and adult contacts of patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome, it is unclear whether this would extend to the pediatric population. OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus among asymptomatic children living near Amoy Gardens (site of largest community outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong) compared with a low-risk region where no community transmission occurred. METHODS. The study was conducted from September to October 2003. Target subjects living in the defined high-risk and low-risk areas were approached through the schools within the respective localities. We recruited 353 and 361 children, respectively, from the high-risk and low-risk areas and collected 3 to 5 mL of blood for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus IgG antibody testing by immunofluorescence antibody assay and confirmation by neutralization test. Parents of all of the subjects who joined the study were contacted by telephone, and a standardized questionnaire was administered by a research nurse to collect information including sociodemographic data, history of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in the subjects and members of the household, history of contact with known cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome, presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome-like symptoms since onset of the severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic, travel history of the child and his/her relatives within the 15 days before any such symptom onset, use of health service as a result of such symptoms, and whether there were deaths of relatives as a result of severe acute respiratory syndrome. RESULTS. Two (0.57%) of 353 asymptomatic children from the high-risk area were tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus antibody compared with 0 of 361 in the low-risk region. None of the 14 children who lived in the high-risk area and had known contacts with severe acute respiratory syndrome patients were seropositive. CONCLUSIONS. As in adults, subclinical severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection was rare in children in the 2003 epidemic. The very low seroprevalence implies little or no population herd immunity to protect against future resurgence of severe acute respiratory syndrome. Copyright © 2006 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. The Journal's web site is located at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatricsen_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectSARSen_HK
dc.subjectSARS-coronavirus seroprevalenceen_HK
dc.subjectSevere acute respiratory syndromeen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viral - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshCoronavirus - immunologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSeroepidemiologic Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - blood - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.titleRisk-stratified seroprevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus among children in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1120-7507&volume=117&issue=6&spage=e1156&epage=1162&date=2006&atitle=Risk-Stratified+Seroprevalence+of+Severe+Acute+Respiratory+Syndrome+Coronavirus+Among+Children+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, PPW: ppwlee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChiu, SS: ssschiu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL: lauylung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, PPW=rp00462en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, SS=rp00421en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1542/peds.2005-1476en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16682490-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33745325242en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros116616en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33745325242&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume117en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee1156en_HK
dc.identifier.epagee1162en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1098-4275-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237979000095-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, PPW=14048822200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WHS=13310222200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, SS=7202291500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=7406034307en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, YL=7201403380en_HK

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