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Article: Health-related physical fitness and weight status in Hong Kong adolescents

TitleHealth-related physical fitness and weight status in Hong Kong adolescents
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/
Citation
Bmc Public Health, 2010, v. 10 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. This study was designed to investigate the relation between health-related physical fitness and weight status in Hong Kong adolescents. Methods. 3,204 students aged 12-18 years participated in the Hong Kong Student Obesity Surveillance (HKSOS) project in 2006-2007. Anthropometric measures (height, weight) and health-related fitness (push-up, sit-up, sit-and-reach, 9-minute run) were assessed. Body mass index (BMI) was computed to classify participants into normal weight, underweight (Grade I, II/III), overweight, and obese groups. The associations of health-related physical fitness with BMI and weight status were examined by partial correlation coefficients and analysis of covariance, respectively. Results. More boys than girls were overweight or obese (18.0% vs 8.7%), but more girls than boys were underweight (22.3% vs 16.7%). Boys performed significantly (P < 0.001) better in sit-up (38.8 vs 31.6 times/min) and 9-minute run (1632.1 vs 1353.2 m), but poorer in sit-and-reach (27.4 vs 32.2 cm) than girls. All four physical fitness tests were significantly positively correlated with each other in both sexes, and BMI was only weakly correlated with sit up and sit-and-reach tests in boys. Decreasing performance (P for trend < 0.05) was observed from normal weight to overweight and obese for push-up, sit-up, and 9-minute run in both sexes. From normal weight to Grade I and Grade II/III underweight, decreasing performance (P for trend < 0.05) for sit-up and sit-and-reach in both sexes and for push-up in boys was observed. Conclusions. The relations between BMI and health-related physical fitness in adolescents were non-linear. Overweight/obese and underweight adolescents had poorer performance in push-up and sit-up tests than normal weight adolescents. Different aspects of health-related physical fitness may serve as immediate indicators of potential health risks for underweight and overweight adolescents. © 2010 Mak et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86657
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.209
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.372
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong, University Research Committee, Strategic Research Theme on Public Health
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the University of Hong Kong, University Research Committee, Strategic Research Theme on Public Health

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMak, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, AMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDay, JRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:19:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:19:43Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBmc Public Health, 2010, v. 10en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86657-
dc.description.abstractBackground. This study was designed to investigate the relation between health-related physical fitness and weight status in Hong Kong adolescents. Methods. 3,204 students aged 12-18 years participated in the Hong Kong Student Obesity Surveillance (HKSOS) project in 2006-2007. Anthropometric measures (height, weight) and health-related fitness (push-up, sit-up, sit-and-reach, 9-minute run) were assessed. Body mass index (BMI) was computed to classify participants into normal weight, underweight (Grade I, II/III), overweight, and obese groups. The associations of health-related physical fitness with BMI and weight status were examined by partial correlation coefficients and analysis of covariance, respectively. Results. More boys than girls were overweight or obese (18.0% vs 8.7%), but more girls than boys were underweight (22.3% vs 16.7%). Boys performed significantly (P < 0.001) better in sit-up (38.8 vs 31.6 times/min) and 9-minute run (1632.1 vs 1353.2 m), but poorer in sit-and-reach (27.4 vs 32.2 cm) than girls. All four physical fitness tests were significantly positively correlated with each other in both sexes, and BMI was only weakly correlated with sit up and sit-and-reach tests in boys. Decreasing performance (P for trend < 0.05) was observed from normal weight to overweight and obese for push-up, sit-up, and 9-minute run in both sexes. From normal weight to Grade I and Grade II/III underweight, decreasing performance (P for trend < 0.05) for sit-up and sit-and-reach in both sexes and for push-up in boys was observed. Conclusions. The relations between BMI and health-related physical fitness in adolescents were non-linear. Overweight/obese and underweight adolescents had poorer performance in push-up and sit-up tests than normal weight adolescents. Different aspects of health-related physical fitness may serve as immediate indicators of potential health risks for underweight and overweight adolescents. © 2010 Mak et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Public Healthen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index-
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshMuscle Strength-
dc.subject.meshObesity - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshPhysical Fitness - physiology-
dc.titleHealth-related physical fitness and weight status in Hong Kong adolescentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1471-2458&volume=10&spage=88&epage=&date=2010&atitle=Health-related+physical+fitness+and+weight+status+in+Hong+Kong+adolescentsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY: syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcManus, AM: alimac@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcManus, AM=rp00936en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-10-88en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20178615-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2836297-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77649294585en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros169578en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77649294585&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume10en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000275409900001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, KK=19934230600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, WS=16022233800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcManus, AM=7004635919en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDay, JR=24773134200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6719887-

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