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Article: Physicians' perceptions towards the impact of and willingness to pay for clinical computerization in Hong Kong

TitlePhysicians' perceptions towards the impact of and willingness to pay for clinical computerization in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsClinical computerization
Contingent valuation
Hong Kong
Willingness-to-pay
Issue Date2004
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijmedinf
Citation
International Journal Of Medical Informatics, 2004, v. 73 n. 5, p. 403-414 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and objectives: We evaluated factors associated with physicians' perceptions towards the effects of computers on health care and on current levels of computerization in their practice. We also performed a contingent valuation to quantify physicians' perceived benefits from computerization in a hypothetical ambulatory, solo clinic. Methods: We surveyed 949 representative physicians in Hong Kong by post. Factor analysis was performed to summarize similar items into categories. Multivariable log-linear regression models were employed to assess the relationships between different factor scores and the number of functions computerized. We elicited their willingness-to-pay (WTP) for three defined computer systems using contingent valuation techniques. WTP values were estimated using econometric modeling by both, parametric and geometric methods. Sociodemographic, attitudinal, and practice-related predictors of WTP were estimated through regression analyses. Results: Factor analysis revealed a three-factor solution which explained 53% of total variance. The overall mean score (mean=3.51±0.45) showed a generally positive attitude towards the effects of computers on health care. Respondents with a higher level of computer knowledge had significantly higher mean overall (P=0.002) and factor scores for all three factors (P<0.01). Higher factor scores on the effects of computers on patient care and clinicians (P=0.006) and on the health system (P=0.032) were associated with a higher number of functions computerized. The parametric median WTP values for computerizing administrative, clinical, and both sets of functions were HK$ 21,205 (US$ 2719), HK$ 34,231 (US$ 4389), and HK$ 45,720 (US$ 5862), respectively, which were lower than the estimates obtained from demand curves using the geometric method [HK$ 43,286 (US$ 5549), HK$ 59,570 (US$ 7637), and HK$ 84,623 (US$ 10,849), respectively]. Doctors with higher incomes were willing to pay more to computerize the clinic, with strong dose-response gradients demonstrated. Those who worked in corporate settings were also more likely to accept higher WTP values. Conclusions: Our findings confirm that better knowledge about computers is contributory to a more positive attitude towards the effects of computers on health care, which is in turn significantly associated with higher levels of actual computerization in clinical practice. WTP values represent the likelihood, in monetary terms, of translating doctors' perceived benefits from computerization into investment action. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86654
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.363
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.405
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, RYTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, TYYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTin, KYKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, IOLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PPSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:19:41Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:19:41Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Medical Informatics, 2004, v. 73 n. 5, p. 403-414en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1386-5056en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86654-
dc.description.abstractBackground and objectives: We evaluated factors associated with physicians' perceptions towards the effects of computers on health care and on current levels of computerization in their practice. We also performed a contingent valuation to quantify physicians' perceived benefits from computerization in a hypothetical ambulatory, solo clinic. Methods: We surveyed 949 representative physicians in Hong Kong by post. Factor analysis was performed to summarize similar items into categories. Multivariable log-linear regression models were employed to assess the relationships between different factor scores and the number of functions computerized. We elicited their willingness-to-pay (WTP) for three defined computer systems using contingent valuation techniques. WTP values were estimated using econometric modeling by both, parametric and geometric methods. Sociodemographic, attitudinal, and practice-related predictors of WTP were estimated through regression analyses. Results: Factor analysis revealed a three-factor solution which explained 53% of total variance. The overall mean score (mean=3.51±0.45) showed a generally positive attitude towards the effects of computers on health care. Respondents with a higher level of computer knowledge had significantly higher mean overall (P=0.002) and factor scores for all three factors (P<0.01). Higher factor scores on the effects of computers on patient care and clinicians (P=0.006) and on the health system (P=0.032) were associated with a higher number of functions computerized. The parametric median WTP values for computerizing administrative, clinical, and both sets of functions were HK$ 21,205 (US$ 2719), HK$ 34,231 (US$ 4389), and HK$ 45,720 (US$ 5862), respectively, which were lower than the estimates obtained from demand curves using the geometric method [HK$ 43,286 (US$ 5549), HK$ 59,570 (US$ 7637), and HK$ 84,623 (US$ 10,849), respectively]. Doctors with higher incomes were willing to pay more to computerize the clinic, with strong dose-response gradients demonstrated. Those who worked in corporate settings were also more likely to accept higher WTP values. Conclusions: Our findings confirm that better knowledge about computers is contributory to a more positive attitude towards the effects of computers on health care, which is in turn significantly associated with higher levels of actual computerization in clinical practice. WTP values represent the likelihood, in monetary terms, of translating doctors' perceived benefits from computerization into investment action. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijmedinfen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Medical Informaticsen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Medical Informatics. Copyright © Elsevier Ireland Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectClinical computerizationen_HK
dc.subjectContingent valuationen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectWillingness-to-payen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnelen_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Computersen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Researchen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInformation Systems - economicsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshOrganizational Innovationen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhysicians - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrivate Practiceen_HK
dc.titlePhysicians' perceptions towards the impact of and willingness to pay for clinical computerization in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1386-5056&volume=73&spage=403&epage=414&date=2004&atitle=Physicians%27+perceptions+towards+the+impact+of+and+willingness+to+pay+for+clinical+computerization+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailJohnston, JM: jjohnsto@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTin, KYK: tinyiukei@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, IOL: iolwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM: lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJohnston, JM=rp00375en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTin, KYK=rp00494en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, IOL=rp01806en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2004.03.003en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15171982-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2542457311en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros87818en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-2542457311&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume73en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage403en_HK
dc.identifier.epage414en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000222130300001-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, RYT=7102833306en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, TYY=24450817900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohnston, JM=7403397964en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTin, KYK=7003796897en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, IOL=7102513940en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PPS=8426498200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_HK

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