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Article: Multilingual home environment and specific language impairment: A case-control study in Chinese children

TitleMultilingual home environment and specific language impairment: A case-control study in Chinese children
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PPE
Citation
Paediatric And Perinatal Epidemiology, 2005, v. 19 n. 4, p. 303-314 How to Cite?
AbstractSpecific language impairment (SLI) is a common developmental disorder in young children. To investigate the association between multilingual home environment and SLI, we conducted a case-control study in Hong Kong Chinese children over a 4-year period in the Duchess of Kent Children's Hospital. Consecutive medical records of all new referrals below 5 years of age were reviewed and children diagnosed with SLI (case) were compared with those referred with other developmental and behavioural problems who had been assessed as having normal language and overall development (control) using the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scale. SLI was defined as those with a language quotient more than one standard deviation below the mean and below the general developmental quotient in children with normal general developmental quotient, but without neurological or other organic diseases. We used binary and ordinal logistic regression to assess any association between SLI and multilingual exposure at home, adjusting for age and gender of subjects, parental age, education level and occupational status, number of siblings, family history of language delay and main caregiver at home. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the effect of covariates on the language comprehension and expression standard scores assessed by the Reynell Developmental Language Scale. A total of 326 cases and 304 controls were included. The mean ages of cases and controls were 2.56 and 2.89 years respectively. Boys predominated in both groups (cases, 75.2%; controls, 60.2%). The children were exposed to between one and four languages at home, the major ones being Cantonese Chinese followed by English. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of SLI was 2.94; [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.82, 4.74] for multilingual compared with monolingual exposure. A significant linear dose-response relationship was found (OR of SLI = 2.58 [1.72, 3.88] for each additional language to which the child was exposed). Male gender (OR = 1.88 [1.24, 2.87]), positive family history (OR = 2.01 [1.17, 3.47]), lower education levels of parents (P = 0.028 for father, P = 0.038 for mother) and lower occupational status of father (P = 0.005) were also risk factors for SLI. Multilingual exposure also significantly reduced the language quotient (P = 0.012) and language comprehension standard score (P = 0.016) of children with SLI, but not of normal children. We concluded that multilingual home environment is associated with SLI with a dose-response relationship. Exposure to multiple languages might adversely affect subsequent language ability. ©2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86629
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.958
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.514
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheuk, DKLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:19:23Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:19:23Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPaediatric And Perinatal Epidemiology, 2005, v. 19 n. 4, p. 303-314en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0269-5022en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86629-
dc.description.abstractSpecific language impairment (SLI) is a common developmental disorder in young children. To investigate the association between multilingual home environment and SLI, we conducted a case-control study in Hong Kong Chinese children over a 4-year period in the Duchess of Kent Children's Hospital. Consecutive medical records of all new referrals below 5 years of age were reviewed and children diagnosed with SLI (case) were compared with those referred with other developmental and behavioural problems who had been assessed as having normal language and overall development (control) using the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scale. SLI was defined as those with a language quotient more than one standard deviation below the mean and below the general developmental quotient in children with normal general developmental quotient, but without neurological or other organic diseases. We used binary and ordinal logistic regression to assess any association between SLI and multilingual exposure at home, adjusting for age and gender of subjects, parental age, education level and occupational status, number of siblings, family history of language delay and main caregiver at home. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the effect of covariates on the language comprehension and expression standard scores assessed by the Reynell Developmental Language Scale. A total of 326 cases and 304 controls were included. The mean ages of cases and controls were 2.56 and 2.89 years respectively. Boys predominated in both groups (cases, 75.2%; controls, 60.2%). The children were exposed to between one and four languages at home, the major ones being Cantonese Chinese followed by English. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of SLI was 2.94; [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.82, 4.74] for multilingual compared with monolingual exposure. A significant linear dose-response relationship was found (OR of SLI = 2.58 [1.72, 3.88] for each additional language to which the child was exposed). Male gender (OR = 1.88 [1.24, 2.87]), positive family history (OR = 2.01 [1.17, 3.47]), lower education levels of parents (P = 0.028 for father, P = 0.038 for mother) and lower occupational status of father (P = 0.005) were also risk factors for SLI. Multilingual exposure also significantly reduced the language quotient (P = 0.012) and language comprehension standard score (P = 0.016) of children with SLI, but not of normal children. We concluded that multilingual home environment is associated with SLI with a dose-response relationship. Exposure to multiple languages might adversely affect subsequent language ability. ©2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PPEen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPaediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsPaediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Varianceen_HK
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshFamily Healthen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLanguage Development Disorders - etiology - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMultilingualismen_HK
dc.subject.meshOccupationsen_HK
dc.subject.meshPaternal Ageen_HK
dc.subject.meshPsychology, Socialen_HK
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_HK
dc.titleMultilingual home environment and specific language impairment: A case-control study in Chinese childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0269-5022&volume=19&issue=4&spage=303&epage=314&date=2005&atitle=Multilingual+home+environment+and+specific+language+impairment:+a+case-control+study+in+Chinese+childrenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, V:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, V=rp00334en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-3016.2005.00668.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15958153-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-21244445332en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros109120en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-21244445332&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage303en_HK
dc.identifier.epage314en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229782200007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheuk, DKL=8705936100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, V=7202525632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

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