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Article: A randomised-controlled trial of two educational modes for undergraduate evidence-based medicine learning in Asia

TitleA randomised-controlled trial of two educational modes for undergraduate evidence-based medicine learning in Asia
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmededuc/
Citation
BMC Medical Education, 2009, v. 9, article no. 63 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: As the overall evidence for the effectiveness of teaching of evidence based medicine (EBM) is not strong, and the impact of cultural and societal influences on teaching method is poorly understood, we undertook a randomised-controlled trial to test the effectiveness and learning satisfaction with two different EBM teaching methods (usual teaching vs. problem based learning (PBL)) for undergraduate medical students. METHODS: A mixed methods study that included a randomised-controlled crossover trial with two intervention arms (usual teaching and PBL) and a nested qualitative study with focus groups to explore student perceptions of learning and to assess the effectiveness and utility of the two teaching methods.All 129 second-year medical students at the University of Hong Kong in 2007.The main outcomes measures were attitudes towards EBM; personal application and current use of EBM; EBM knowledge; future use of EBM. RESULTS: PBL was less effective at imparting knowledge than usual teaching consisting of a lecture followed by a group tutorial. After usual teaching students showed improvement in scores for 'attitudes towards EBM', 'personal application and current use of EBM' and 'EBM knowledge, which were not evident after PBL. In contrast to the usual teaching, students found PBL difficult as they lacked the statistical knowledge necessary to support discussion, failed to understand core concepts, and lost direction. CONCLUSION: The evidence presented here would suggest that the teaching of EBM within an Asian environment should adopt a format that facilitates both the acquisition of knowledge and encourages enquiry.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86616
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.312
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.698
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:19:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:19:13Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBMC Medical Education, 2009, v. 9, article no. 63en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1472-6920en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86616-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: As the overall evidence for the effectiveness of teaching of evidence based medicine (EBM) is not strong, and the impact of cultural and societal influences on teaching method is poorly understood, we undertook a randomised-controlled trial to test the effectiveness and learning satisfaction with two different EBM teaching methods (usual teaching vs. problem based learning (PBL)) for undergraduate medical students. METHODS: A mixed methods study that included a randomised-controlled crossover trial with two intervention arms (usual teaching and PBL) and a nested qualitative study with focus groups to explore student perceptions of learning and to assess the effectiveness and utility of the two teaching methods.All 129 second-year medical students at the University of Hong Kong in 2007.The main outcomes measures were attitudes towards EBM; personal application and current use of EBM; EBM knowledge; future use of EBM. RESULTS: PBL was less effective at imparting knowledge than usual teaching consisting of a lecture followed by a group tutorial. After usual teaching students showed improvement in scores for 'attitudes towards EBM', 'personal application and current use of EBM' and 'EBM knowledge, which were not evident after PBL. In contrast to the usual teaching, students found PBL difficult as they lacked the statistical knowledge necessary to support discussion, failed to understand core concepts, and lost direction. CONCLUSION: The evidence presented here would suggest that the teaching of EBM within an Asian environment should adopt a format that facilitates both the acquisition of knowledge and encourages enquiry.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmededuc/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Medical Educationen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_HK
dc.subject.meshCurriculum-
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Undergraduate - methods-
dc.subject.meshEvidence-Based Medicine - education-
dc.subject.meshFaculty, Medical-
dc.subject.meshProblem-Based Learning-
dc.titleA randomised-controlled trial of two educational modes for undergraduate evidence-based medicine learning in Asiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1472-6920&volume=9&spage=63&epage=&date=2009&atitle=A+randomised-controlled+trial+of+two+educational+modes+for+undergraduate+evidence-based+medicine+learning+in+Asiaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJohnston, JM: jjohnsto@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJohnston, JM=rp00375en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6920-9-63en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19785777-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2761870-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957271502en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros168030en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957271502&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume9, article no. 63en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000284713700001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohnston, JM=7403397964en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5871873-

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