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Article: Infant growth during the first year of life and subsequent hospitalization to 8 years of age

TitleInfant growth during the first year of life and subsequent hospitalization to 8 years of age
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.com
Citation
Epidemiology, 2010, v. 21 n. 3, p. 332-339 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: There is accumulating evidence that rapid infant growth is associated with subsequent metabolic risk, but less investigation of potential benefits. We tested the life history trade-off hypothesis that rapid infant growth is associated with lower risk of serious childhood morbidity (in particular, infection) proxied by hospital admission. METHODS: We studied term births (n = 7833, 94% follow-up) from a Chinese birth cohort, "Children of 1997," comprising 88% of births in Hong Kong in April and May 1997. We used multivariable negative binomial regression to examine the association of growth trajectory (5 categories) from birth to 12 months with subsequent hospital admissions until the child's 8th birthday. Potential confounders included sex, gestational age, parental education, type of birth hospital, infant feeding, and the presence of congenital disease. RESULTS: Infants with the slowest growth trajectory (smallest birth weight and slowest weight gain) were more likely to be hospitalized between 1 and 8 years of age-particularly for noninfectious illnesses. Infants in the 4 faster growth trajectories differed little in their risk of hospitalization. Adjusted incident rate ratios of hospitalization for infectious diseases were 0.93 (95% confidence interval = 0.81-1.06), 0.97 (0.85-1.12), 0.91 (0.78-1.06), and 0.92 (0.79-1.08) for the 4 faster growth trajectories compared with the slowest. Results were similar when growth was assessed as change in weight-for-age z-score. CONCLUSION: Fast infant growth does not protect against serious infectious morbidity, but low birth weight infants born with slow growth are more vulnerable to serious morbidity, either as a consequence of poor growth or as a parallel marker of underlying health state. Whether maximum growth rates are ideal should be considered, as should the effects of infant over-nutrition. © 2010 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86612
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.075
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.981
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, LLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, MYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeunga, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:19:10Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:19:10Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology, 2010, v. 21 n. 3, p. 332-339en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1044-3983en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86612-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: There is accumulating evidence that rapid infant growth is associated with subsequent metabolic risk, but less investigation of potential benefits. We tested the life history trade-off hypothesis that rapid infant growth is associated with lower risk of serious childhood morbidity (in particular, infection) proxied by hospital admission. METHODS: We studied term births (n = 7833, 94% follow-up) from a Chinese birth cohort, "Children of 1997," comprising 88% of births in Hong Kong in April and May 1997. We used multivariable negative binomial regression to examine the association of growth trajectory (5 categories) from birth to 12 months with subsequent hospital admissions until the child's 8th birthday. Potential confounders included sex, gestational age, parental education, type of birth hospital, infant feeding, and the presence of congenital disease. RESULTS: Infants with the slowest growth trajectory (smallest birth weight and slowest weight gain) were more likely to be hospitalized between 1 and 8 years of age-particularly for noninfectious illnesses. Infants in the 4 faster growth trajectories differed little in their risk of hospitalization. Adjusted incident rate ratios of hospitalization for infectious diseases were 0.93 (95% confidence interval = 0.81-1.06), 0.97 (0.85-1.12), 0.91 (0.78-1.06), and 0.92 (0.79-1.08) for the 4 faster growth trajectories compared with the slowest. Results were similar when growth was assessed as change in weight-for-age z-score. CONCLUSION: Fast infant growth does not protect against serious infectious morbidity, but low birth weight infants born with slow growth are more vulnerable to serious morbidity, either as a consequence of poor growth or as a parallel marker of underlying health state. Whether maximum growth rates are ideal should be considered, as should the effects of infant over-nutrition. © 2010 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChild Development - physiology-
dc.subject.meshHospitalization - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshMedical Audit-
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies-
dc.titleInfant growth during the first year of life and subsequent hospitalization to 8 years of ageen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1044-3983&volume=21&issue=3&spage=332&epage=339&date=2010&atitle=Infant+growth+during+the+first+year+of+life+and+subsequent+hospitalization+to+8+years+of+ageen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHui, LL: huic@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM: lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHui, LL=rp01698en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/EDE.0b013e3181cd709een_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20220525-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951015063en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros169731en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77951015063&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage332en_HK
dc.identifier.epage339en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000277071500007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, LL=12774460100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, MY=24469381500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeunga, GM=36340091700en_HK

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