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Article: Predicting stress in first year medical students: A longitudinal study

TitlePredicting stress in first year medical students: A longitudinal study
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110
Citation
Medical Education, 1997, v. 31 n. 3, p. 163-168 How to Cite?
AbstractWhile there is ample documentation that medical training is stressful, less is known about predictive variables that might identify students who have the most difficulty in managing stress during medical training. Depression and anxiety in first year medical students were investigated in a longitudinal design. One-hundred and twenty-one medical students (81% of the class) were surveyed. The first survey took place immediately prior to the beginning of medical training (wave 1); the second survey was approximately 8 months after the beginning of classes (wave 2). Medical students who began their first year with relatively low 'A' level grades, high ratings of state anxiety and depression, high trait anxiety and low dispositional optimism, and reliance on avoidant coping strategies were found to be at higher risk for developing depression and anxiety symptoms at wave 2. Students reported increased concern about curriculum and environment, personal competence and endurance, and time to have a life outside medical school at wave 2, compared to their reports at wave 1. Increase in concerns correlated with an increase in depression and anxiety. At both surveys, use of avoidant coping strategies resulted in increased depression and anxiety; at wave 2, active coping and positive reinterpretation resulted in decreased depression and anxiety. These findings suggest characteristics of vulnerable students who might be identified early in their first year and provided with additional support. Educating students to expect an increase in concerns about environment and personal ability to manage the academic load might make these concerns less overwhelming. In addition, information about effective coping strategies (i.e. active coping efforts) and ineffective means of dealing with stress (avoidant coping efforts) might be helpful in preventing distress.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86596
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.369
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.913
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStewart, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBetson, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, IBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, PWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:18:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:18:59Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMedical Education, 1997, v. 31 n. 3, p. 163-168en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0308-0110en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86596-
dc.description.abstractWhile there is ample documentation that medical training is stressful, less is known about predictive variables that might identify students who have the most difficulty in managing stress during medical training. Depression and anxiety in first year medical students were investigated in a longitudinal design. One-hundred and twenty-one medical students (81% of the class) were surveyed. The first survey took place immediately prior to the beginning of medical training (wave 1); the second survey was approximately 8 months after the beginning of classes (wave 2). Medical students who began their first year with relatively low 'A' level grades, high ratings of state anxiety and depression, high trait anxiety and low dispositional optimism, and reliance on avoidant coping strategies were found to be at higher risk for developing depression and anxiety symptoms at wave 2. Students reported increased concern about curriculum and environment, personal competence and endurance, and time to have a life outside medical school at wave 2, compared to their reports at wave 1. Increase in concerns correlated with an increase in depression and anxiety. At both surveys, use of avoidant coping strategies resulted in increased depression and anxiety; at wave 2, active coping and positive reinterpretation resulted in decreased depression and anxiety. These findings suggest characteristics of vulnerable students who might be identified early in their first year and provided with additional support. Educating students to expect an increase in concerns about environment and personal ability to manage the academic load might make these concerns less overwhelming. In addition, information about effective coping strategies (i.e. active coping efforts) and ineffective means of dealing with stress (avoidant coping efforts) might be helpful in preventing distress.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Educationen_HK
dc.rightsMedical Education. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAnxiety - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDepression - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Undergraduateen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medical - psychologyen_HK
dc.titlePredicting stress in first year medical students: A longitudinal studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0308-0110&volume=31&spage=163&epage=168&date=1997&atitle=Predicting+stress+in+first+year+medical+students:+a+longitudinal+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM:hrmrwcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid9231132-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030758410en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros24636en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030758410&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume31en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage163en_HK
dc.identifier.epage168en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997XB59900003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStewart, SM=35460013800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBetson, C=6602173411en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarshall, IB=7202159128en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, PWH=7406120357en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_HK

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