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Article: How does socioeconomic development affect risk of mortality? An age-period-cohort analysis from a recently transitioned population in China

TitleHow does socioeconomic development affect risk of mortality? An age-period-cohort analysis from a recently transitioned population in China
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Epidemiology, 2010, v. 171 n. 3, p. 345-356 How to Cite?
AbstractDuring the 20th century, the Hong Kong Chinese population experienced 2 abrupt but temporally distinct macroenvironmental changes: The transition from essentially preindustrial living conditions to a rapidly developing economy through mass migration in the late 1940s was followed by the emergence of an infant and childhood adiposity epidemic in the 1960s. The authors aimed to delineate the effects of these 2 aspects of economic development on mortality, thus providing a sentinel for other rapidly developing economies. Sex-specific Poisson models were used to estimate effects of age, calendar period, and birth cohort on Hong Kong adult mortality between 1976 and 2005. All-cause and cause-specific mortality, including mortality from ischemic heart disease (IHD), cardiovascular disease excluding IHD, lung cancer, other cancers, and respiratory disease, were considered. Male mortality from IHD and female mortality from other cancers increased with birth into a more economically developed environment. Cardiovascular disease mortality increased with birth after the start of the infant and childhood adiposity epidemic, particularly for men. Macroenvironmental changes associated with economic development had sex-specific effects over the life course, probably originating in early life. The full population health consequences of these changes are unlikely to manifest until persons who have spent their early lives in such environments reach an age at which they become vulnerable to chronic diseases.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86571
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.036
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.047
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This work received no financial support, except for a research postgraduate studentship to R. Y. C. from the University of Hong Kong.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, RYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:18:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:18:40Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Epidemiology, 2010, v. 171 n. 3, p. 345-356en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86571-
dc.description.abstractDuring the 20th century, the Hong Kong Chinese population experienced 2 abrupt but temporally distinct macroenvironmental changes: The transition from essentially preindustrial living conditions to a rapidly developing economy through mass migration in the late 1940s was followed by the emergence of an infant and childhood adiposity epidemic in the 1960s. The authors aimed to delineate the effects of these 2 aspects of economic development on mortality, thus providing a sentinel for other rapidly developing economies. Sex-specific Poisson models were used to estimate effects of age, calendar period, and birth cohort on Hong Kong adult mortality between 1976 and 2005. All-cause and cause-specific mortality, including mortality from ischemic heart disease (IHD), cardiovascular disease excluding IHD, lung cancer, other cancers, and respiratory disease, were considered. Male mortality from IHD and female mortality from other cancers increased with birth into a more economically developed environment. Cardiovascular disease mortality increased with birth after the start of the infant and childhood adiposity epidemic, particularly for men. Macroenvironmental changes associated with economic development had sex-specific effects over the life course, probably originating in early life. The full population health consequences of these changes are unlikely to manifest until persons who have spent their early lives in such environments reach an age at which they become vulnerable to chronic diseases.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsAmerican Journal of Epidemiology. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshBirth Rateen_HK
dc.subject.meshCause of Deathen_HK
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshEconomic Development - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshEmigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshMyocardial Ischemia - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshObesity - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTransients and Migrants - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.titleHow does socioeconomic development affect risk of mortality? An age-period-cohort analysis from a recently transitioned population in Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0002-9262&volume=171&issue=3&spage=345&epage=356&date=2010&atitle=How+does+socioeconomic+development+affect+risk+of+mortality?+An+age-period-cohort+analysis+from+a+recently+transitioned+population+in+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ:bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwp378en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20042438-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3291084-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-75149168356en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros168755en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-75149168356&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume171en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage345en_HK
dc.identifier.epage356en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000273866000010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, RY=23988568600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

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