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Article: Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and cardiovascular risk factors in the non-diabetic and newly diagnosed diabetic Chinese: Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-CVD

TitleBrachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and cardiovascular risk factors in the non-diabetic and newly diagnosed diabetic Chinese: Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-CVD
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/10009394
Citation
Diabetes/Metabolism Research And Reviews, 2010, v. 26 n. 2, p. 133-139 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Increased arterial stiffness is an important cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We examined determinants of arterial stiffness in subjects across strata of glycaemic status. Methods: A total of 1249 subjects from a sub-study of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (GBCS-CVD) had brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) measured by automatic oscillometric method. Major cardiovascular risk factors including glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA 1c), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), fasting triglyceride, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and both fasting and post 2-h oral glucose-load glucose, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were assessed. Results In all, 649, 479 and 121 subjects were classified into normoglycaemia, impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) and newly diagnosed diabetes groups, respectively. Both age and systolic blood pressure were significantly associated with increased baPWV in all three groups (all p < 0.001). In both normoglycaemic and IGM groups, hsCRP and HbA 1c were positively associated with baPWV (p from 0.04 to <0.001), whereas current smoking and triglyceride were associated with baPWV in the normoglycaemic and IGM group, respectively (p = 0.04 and 0.001). No gender difference in baPWV was observed in the normoglycaemic or IGM groups. However, in the newly diagnosed diabetes group, men had higher baPWV than women (p = 0.01). Conclusions: In the normoglycaemic and IGM subjects, after adjusting for age, blood pressure and other confounders, increasing HbA 1c was associated with increased baPWV, suggesting a pathophysiological role of chronic glycaemia that can contribute to vascular disease risk in persons without diabetes. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86563
ISSN
2012 Impact Factor: 2.968
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.617
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China/Research Grants Counci30518001
HKU720/05
Funding Information:

The study is funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China/Research Grants Council (No. 30518001; HKU720/05) grant. The University of Hong Kong Foundation for Educational Development and Research, Hong Kong; the Guangzhou Public Health Bureau and the Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau, Guangzhou, China; and The University of Birmingham, UK. The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-CVD investigators include: the Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital: J. M. Lin, X. J. Yue, C. Q. Jiang (Co-PI); The University of Hong Kong: T. H. Lam; The Chinese University of Hong Kong: B. Tomlinson, K. S. Wong; The University of Birmingham: B. Cheung, G. N. Thomas (Co-PI).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYue, XJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorJin, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:18:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:18:34Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDiabetes/Metabolism Research And Reviews, 2010, v. 26 n. 2, p. 133-139en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1520-7552en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86563-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Increased arterial stiffness is an important cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We examined determinants of arterial stiffness in subjects across strata of glycaemic status. Methods: A total of 1249 subjects from a sub-study of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (GBCS-CVD) had brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) measured by automatic oscillometric method. Major cardiovascular risk factors including glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA 1c), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), fasting triglyceride, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and both fasting and post 2-h oral glucose-load glucose, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were assessed. Results In all, 649, 479 and 121 subjects were classified into normoglycaemia, impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) and newly diagnosed diabetes groups, respectively. Both age and systolic blood pressure were significantly associated with increased baPWV in all three groups (all p < 0.001). In both normoglycaemic and IGM groups, hsCRP and HbA 1c were positively associated with baPWV (p from 0.04 to <0.001), whereas current smoking and triglyceride were associated with baPWV in the normoglycaemic and IGM group, respectively (p = 0.04 and 0.001). No gender difference in baPWV was observed in the normoglycaemic or IGM groups. However, in the newly diagnosed diabetes group, men had higher baPWV than women (p = 0.01). Conclusions: In the normoglycaemic and IGM subjects, after adjusting for age, blood pressure and other confounders, increasing HbA 1c was associated with increased baPWV, suggesting a pathophysiological role of chronic glycaemia that can contribute to vascular disease risk in persons without diabetes. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/10009394en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDiabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviewsen_HK
dc.rightsDiabetes - Metabolism: Research and Reviews. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAnkle - blood supplyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Flow Velocity - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - physiopathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - physiopathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshPulsatile Flowen_HK
dc.subject.meshPulseen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.titleBrachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and cardiovascular risk factors in the non-diabetic and newly diagnosed diabetic Chinese: Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-CVDen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1520-7552&volume=26&issue=2&spage=133&epage=139&date=2010&atitle=Brachial-ankle+pulse+wave+velocity+and+cardiovascular+risk+factors+in+the+non-diabetic+and+newly+diagnosed+diabetic+Chinese:+Guangzhou+Biobank+Cohort+Study-CVDen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/dmrr.1059en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20054879-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77950431330en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros169583en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77950431330&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume26en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage133en_HK
dc.identifier.epage139en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276833600009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, L=7404744449en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYue, XJ=35410971600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, B=36079151900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJin, YL=35558481400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=13410704100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK

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