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Article: Cardiorespiratory and all-cause mortality after restrictions on sulphur content of fuel in Hong Kong: An intervention study

TitleCardiorespiratory and all-cause mortality after restrictions on sulphur content of fuel in Hong Kong: An intervention study
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherThe Lancet Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/lancet
Citation
Lancet, 2002, v. 360 n. 9346, p. 1646-1652 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: In July, 1990, a restriction was introduced over one weekend that required all power plants and road vehicles in Hong Kong to use fuel oil with a sulphur content of not more than 0.5% by weight. This intervention led to an immediate fall in ambient sulphur dioxide (SO2). We assessed the effect of this intervention on mortality over the next 5 years. Methods: Changes in trends in deaths were estimated by a Poisson regression model of deaths each month between 1985 and 1995. Changes in seasonal deaths immediately after the intervention were measured by the increase in deaths from warm to cool season. We also estimated the annual proportional change in number of deaths before and after the intervention. We used age-specific death rates to estimate person-years of life gained. Findings: In the first 12 months after introduction of the restriction, a substantial reduction in seasonal deaths was noted, followed by a peak in the cool-season death rate between 13 and 24 months, returning to the expected pattern during years 3-5. Compared with predictions, the intervention led to a significant decline in the average annual trend in deaths from all causes (2.1%; p=0.001), respiratory (3.9%; p=0.0014) and cardiovascular (2.0%; p=0.0214) diseases, but not from other causes. The average gain in life expectancy per year of exposure to the lower pollutant concentration was 20 days (females) to 41 days (males). Interpretation: Pollution resulting from sulphur-rich fuels has an effect on death rates, especially respiratory and cardiovascular deaths. The outcome of the Hong Kong intervention provides direct evidence that control of this pollution has immediate and long-term health benefits.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86532
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 44.002
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 14.638
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThach, TQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMa, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, HRen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:18:12Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:18:12Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLancet, 2002, v. 360 n. 9346, p. 1646-1652en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0140-6736en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86532-
dc.description.abstractBackground: In July, 1990, a restriction was introduced over one weekend that required all power plants and road vehicles in Hong Kong to use fuel oil with a sulphur content of not more than 0.5% by weight. This intervention led to an immediate fall in ambient sulphur dioxide (SO2). We assessed the effect of this intervention on mortality over the next 5 years. Methods: Changes in trends in deaths were estimated by a Poisson regression model of deaths each month between 1985 and 1995. Changes in seasonal deaths immediately after the intervention were measured by the increase in deaths from warm to cool season. We also estimated the annual proportional change in number of deaths before and after the intervention. We used age-specific death rates to estimate person-years of life gained. Findings: In the first 12 months after introduction of the restriction, a substantial reduction in seasonal deaths was noted, followed by a peak in the cool-season death rate between 13 and 24 months, returning to the expected pattern during years 3-5. Compared with predictions, the intervention led to a significant decline in the average annual trend in deaths from all causes (2.1%; p=0.001), respiratory (3.9%; p=0.0014) and cardiovascular (2.0%; p=0.0214) diseases, but not from other causes. The average gain in life expectancy per year of exposure to the lower pollutant concentration was 20 days (females) to 41 days (males). Interpretation: Pollution resulting from sulphur-rich fuels has an effect on death rates, especially respiratory and cardiovascular deaths. The outcome of the Hong Kong intervention provides direct evidence that control of this pollution has immediate and long-term health benefits.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe Lancet Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/lanceten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLanceten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants - adverse effects - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposureen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshFuel Oilsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshIntervention Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSulfur Dioxide - adverse effects - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rateen_HK
dc.titleCardiorespiratory and all-cause mortality after restrictions on sulphur content of fuel in Hong Kong: An intervention studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0140-6736&volume=360&spage=1646&epage=1652&date=2002&atitle=Cardiorespiratory+and+all-cause+mortality+after+restrictions+on+sulphur+content+of+fuel+in+Hong+Kong:+an+intervention+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM:hrmrwcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailThach, TQ:thach@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityThach, TQ=rp00450en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0140-6736(02)11612-6en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12457788-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037164343en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros75013en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037164343&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume360en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9346en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1646en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1652en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000179393900010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThach, TQ=6602850066en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMa, S=24477737900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAnderson, HR=7402166391en_HK

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