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Article: Synchrony of clinical and laboratory surveillance for influenza in Hong Kong

TitleSynchrony of clinical and laboratory surveillance for influenza in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2008, v. 3 n. 1 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Consultation rates of influenza-like illness (ILI) in an outpatient setting have been regarded as a good indicator of influenza virus activity in the community. As ILI-like symptoms may be caused by etiologies other than influenza, and influenza virus activity in the tropics and subtropics is less predictable than in temperate regions, the correlation between of ILI and influenza virus activity in tropical and subtropical regions is less well defined. Methodology and Principal Findings: In this study, we used wavelet analysis to investigate the relationship between seasonality of influenza virus activity and consultation rates of ILI reported separately by General Out-patient Clinics (GOPC) and General Practitioners (GP). During the periods 1998-2000 and 2002-2003, influenza virus activity exhibited both annual and semiannual cycles, with one peak in the winter and another in late spring or early summer. But during 2001 and 2004-2006, only annual cycles could be clearly identified. ILI consultation rates in both GOPC and GP settings share a similar non-stationary seasonal pattern. We found high coherence between ILI in GOPC and influenza virus activity for the annual cycle but this was only significant (P<0.05) during the periods 1998-1999 and 2002-2006. For the semiannual cycle high coherence (p<0.05) was also found significant during the period 1998-1999 and year 2003 when two peaks of influenza were evident. Similarly, ILI in GP setting is also associated with influenza virus activity for both the annual and semiannual cycles. On average, oscillation of ILI in GP and of ILI in GOPC preceded influenza virus isolation by approximately four and two weeks, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that consultation rates of ILI precede the oscillations of laboratory surveillance by at least two weeks and can be used as a predictor for influenza epidemics in Hong Kong. The validity of our model for other tropical regions needs to be explored. © 2008 Yang et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86521
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 3.234
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.300
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease of the Health, Welfare and Food Bureau of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government0405021
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease of the Health, Welfare and Food Bureau of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government (RFCID No. 0405021). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, EHYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOu, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:18:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:18:04Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2008, v. 3 n. 1en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86521-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Consultation rates of influenza-like illness (ILI) in an outpatient setting have been regarded as a good indicator of influenza virus activity in the community. As ILI-like symptoms may be caused by etiologies other than influenza, and influenza virus activity in the tropics and subtropics is less predictable than in temperate regions, the correlation between of ILI and influenza virus activity in tropical and subtropical regions is less well defined. Methodology and Principal Findings: In this study, we used wavelet analysis to investigate the relationship between seasonality of influenza virus activity and consultation rates of ILI reported separately by General Out-patient Clinics (GOPC) and General Practitioners (GP). During the periods 1998-2000 and 2002-2003, influenza virus activity exhibited both annual and semiannual cycles, with one peak in the winter and another in late spring or early summer. But during 2001 and 2004-2006, only annual cycles could be clearly identified. ILI consultation rates in both GOPC and GP settings share a similar non-stationary seasonal pattern. We found high coherence between ILI in GOPC and influenza virus activity for the annual cycle but this was only significant (P<0.05) during the periods 1998-1999 and 2002-2006. For the semiannual cycle high coherence (p<0.05) was also found significant during the period 1998-1999 and year 2003 when two peaks of influenza were evident. Similarly, ILI in GP setting is also associated with influenza virus activity for both the annual and semiannual cycles. On average, oscillation of ILI in GP and of ILI in GOPC preceded influenza virus isolation by approximately four and two weeks, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that consultation rates of ILI precede the oscillations of laboratory surveillance by at least two weeks and can be used as a predictor for influenza epidemics in Hong Kong. The validity of our model for other tropical regions needs to be explored. © 2008 Yang et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillance-
dc.subject.meshSeasons-
dc.titleSynchrony of clinical and laboratory surveillance for influenza in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM: hrmrwcm@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, EHY: ehylau@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, EHY=rp01349en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0001399en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18167558en_HK
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2151138-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38949142578en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros138996en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-38949142578&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee1399-
dc.identifier.epagee1399-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000260468900027-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, L=7406279703en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, EHY=7103086074en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KP=27171298000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOu, CQ=14070561800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK

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