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Article: Strategies of information disclosure to chinese cancer patients in an asian community

TitleStrategies of information disclosure to chinese cancer patients in an asian community
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 1998, v. 7 n. 3, p. 240-251 How to Cite?
AbstractThere is little information available on strategies of information disclosure used by doctors in the care of patients with cancer. This report focuses on the style of disclosure used by doctors when giving diagnostic and prognostic information to patients with cancer. Among 46% of 133 surgeons and radiotherapists interviewed, disclosure of diagnosis involved a sudden approach (information given outright at one sitting). Less commonly used (19%) was a gradual disclosure style. Of the remainder who disclosed, more than half did so through the family or left it to the family to tell the patient. Doctors specially and patients' requests for prognostic information dictated disclosure style most frequently. Single people were more likely to have information disclosed to their families than were married people. While anecdotal accounts indicate negative reactions on the part of patients are a major reason for withholding such information, different disclosure style had little effect on doctors' reports of patient reactions to the bad news. Doctors perceived 25% of patients appeared to reach 'with depression' but the remaining 75% appeared a 'calm'. These results suggest patients are more likely to be told bad news suddenly, and that doctors do not perceive that this impacts too negatively on patients. The high levels of reported preference for information about cancer in Hong Kong (Fielding and Hung, 1996) conflict with actual prevalence patterns. It seems that commonly cited anecdotal reasons for withholding information from cancer patients in Hong Kong are not sustained by the data produced in these studies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86514
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorKo, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:17:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:17:59Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 1998, v. 7 n. 3, p. 240-251en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86514-
dc.description.abstractThere is little information available on strategies of information disclosure used by doctors in the care of patients with cancer. This report focuses on the style of disclosure used by doctors when giving diagnostic and prognostic information to patients with cancer. Among 46% of 133 surgeons and radiotherapists interviewed, disclosure of diagnosis involved a sudden approach (information given outright at one sitting). Less commonly used (19%) was a gradual disclosure style. Of the remainder who disclosed, more than half did so through the family or left it to the family to tell the patient. Doctors specially and patients' requests for prognostic information dictated disclosure style most frequently. Single people were more likely to have information disclosed to their families than were married people. While anecdotal accounts indicate negative reactions on the part of patients are a major reason for withholding such information, different disclosure style had little effect on doctors' reports of patient reactions to the bad news. Doctors perceived 25% of patients appeared to reach 'with depression' but the remaining 75% appeared a 'calm'. These results suggest patients are more likely to be told bad news suddenly, and that doctors do not perceive that this impacts too negatively on patients. The high levels of reported preference for information about cancer in Hong Kong (Fielding and Hung, 1996) conflict with actual prevalence patterns. It seems that commonly cited anecdotal reasons for withholding information from cancer patients in Hong Kong are not sustained by the data produced in these studies.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_HK
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnelen_HK
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshEpisode of Careen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Surveysen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHospitals - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMedicineen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms - diagnosis - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPatient Education as Topic - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhysician-Patient Relationsen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhysicians - psychology - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshProfessional-Family Relationsen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshSampling Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpecializationen_HK
dc.subject.meshTruth Disclosureen_HK
dc.titleStrategies of information disclosure to chinese cancer patients in an asian communityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1057-9249&volume=7&spage=240&epage=251&date=1998&atitle=Strategies+of+information+disclosure+to+Chinese+cancer+patients+in+an+Asian+communityen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1099-1611(199805/06)7:3<240::AID-PON305>3.0.CO;2-6en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9638785-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031861034en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros32554en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031861034&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume7en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage240en_HK
dc.identifier.epage251en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000074182700166-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, L=12789440200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKo, L=35989243200en_HK

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