File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Napping is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

TitleNapping is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.org
Citation
Sleep, 2010, v. 33 n. 3, p. 402-407 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy Objective: Intentional napping is very common, particularly in China. However, there are limited data regarding its potential health effects. We therefore examined the possible relationship between napping and type 2 diabetes. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Setting: Community-based elderly association in Guangzhou, China. Participants: 19,567 Chinese men and women aged 50 years or older. Measurements and Results: Self-reported frequency of napping was obtained by questionnaire and type 2 diabetes was assessed by fasting blood glucose and/or self-reports of physician diagnosis or treatment. Participants reporting frequent naps (4-6 days/week and daily) were 42% to 52% more likely to have diabetes. The relationships remained essentially unchanged after adjustments were made for demographics, lifestyle and sleep habits, health status, adiposity, and metabolic markers (odds ratio for diabetes 1.36 [95% CI 1.17-1.57] in 4-6 days/week, 1.28 [1.15-1.44] in daily nappers). Similar associations were found between napping and impaired fasting glucose. Removal of those with potential ill health and daytime sleepiness did not alter the observed associations. Conclusions: Napping is associated with elevated prevalence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in this older Chinese sample. Our finding suggests that it is less likely that diabetes leads to daytime sleepiness. This raises the possibility that napping may increase the risk of diabetes. Confirmation by longitudinal studies is needed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86505
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.793
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.606
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, KBHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorArora, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTaheri, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAdab, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:17:53Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:17:53Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSleep, 2010, v. 33 n. 3, p. 402-407en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0161-8105en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86505-
dc.description.abstractStudy Objective: Intentional napping is very common, particularly in China. However, there are limited data regarding its potential health effects. We therefore examined the possible relationship between napping and type 2 diabetes. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Setting: Community-based elderly association in Guangzhou, China. Participants: 19,567 Chinese men and women aged 50 years or older. Measurements and Results: Self-reported frequency of napping was obtained by questionnaire and type 2 diabetes was assessed by fasting blood glucose and/or self-reports of physician diagnosis or treatment. Participants reporting frequent naps (4-6 days/week and daily) were 42% to 52% more likely to have diabetes. The relationships remained essentially unchanged after adjustments were made for demographics, lifestyle and sleep habits, health status, adiposity, and metabolic markers (odds ratio for diabetes 1.36 [95% CI 1.17-1.57] in 4-6 days/week, 1.28 [1.15-1.44] in daily nappers). Similar associations were found between napping and impaired fasting glucose. Removal of those with potential ill health and daytime sleepiness did not alter the observed associations. Conclusions: Napping is associated with elevated prevalence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in this older Chinese sample. Our finding suggests that it is less likely that diabetes leads to daytime sleepiness. This raises the possibility that napping may increase the risk of diabetes. Confirmation by longitudinal studies is needed.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSleepen_HK
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshChinaen_HK
dc.subject.meshCircadian Rhythmen_HK
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHabitsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshRisken_HK
dc.subject.meshSleepen_HK
dc.subject.meshStatistics as Topicen_HK
dc.titleNapping is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0161-8105&volume=33&issue=3&spage=402&epage=407&date=2010&atitle=Napping+is+associated+with+increased+risk+of+type+2+diabetes:+The+Guangzhou+Biobank+Cohort+Studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid20337199-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2831435-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77649268851en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros169113en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77649268851&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume33en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage402en_HK
dc.identifier.epage407en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000275187600018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KBH=35168055500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridArora, T=6603799551en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=13410704100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTaheri, S=7005019856en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAdab, P=6601949045en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats