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Article: Training nurses and social workers in smoking cessation counseling: A population needs assessment in Hong Kong

TitleTraining nurses and social workers in smoking cessation counseling: A population needs assessment in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsHong Kong
Nurses
Smoking cessation counseling
Social workers
Issue Date2005
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ypmed
Citation
Preventive Medicine, 2005, v. 40 n. 4, p. 389-406 How to Cite?
AbstractTo achieve greater coverage of elderly smokers and to shift entire populations toward cessation, the provider-client interface could be broadened beyond physicians to include nurses and social workers, who can be formally trained to provide such services. We carried out a population-based training needs assessment of the latter two groups in Hong Kong. Three thousand seven hundred eligible hospital-based nurses and 2,258 social workers who had elderly clients in Hong Kong were recruited in a knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) cross-sectional survey. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify predictors for two key outcomes-"initiation and advice" (ask and advise) and "follow-through" (assess, assist and arrange), based on the U.S. Agency for Health Care Policy Research framework. One thousand eight hundred forty-three (49.8%) nurses and 1,499 (66.4%) social workers responded. Nurses reported a much higher level of engagement in smoking cessation activities than social workers in all five steps of the AHCPR framework (P < 0.001). Nurses (mean score = 2.99 ± 0.40 on a 4-point Likert scale) had more positive attitudes to tobacco control and smoking cessation counseling compared to social workers (mean score = 2.79 ± 0.41; P < 0.001), whereas the latter group perceived themselves as more competent in handling such practice (mean score nurses = 2.36 ± 0.52, mean score social workers = 2.51 ± 0.39; P < 0.001). Both attitudinal and self-perceived competence scores predicted incremental gains in the likelihood of offering "follow-through" interventions in addition to those observed for "initiation and advice" actions. Our findings highlight a large degree of unmet need in Hong Kong's hospital-based nurses and social workers who work with the elderly regarding smoking cessation service provision and training. Future research should focus on developing and evaluating programs that encourage nurses and social workers to provide cessation interventions to exert a much greater collective impact than doctors can alone. © 2004 The Institute For Cancer Prevention and Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86495
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.893
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.621
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, SKKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChi, Ien_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:17:45Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:17:45Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPreventive Medicine, 2005, v. 40 n. 4, p. 389-406en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0091-7435en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86495-
dc.description.abstractTo achieve greater coverage of elderly smokers and to shift entire populations toward cessation, the provider-client interface could be broadened beyond physicians to include nurses and social workers, who can be formally trained to provide such services. We carried out a population-based training needs assessment of the latter two groups in Hong Kong. Three thousand seven hundred eligible hospital-based nurses and 2,258 social workers who had elderly clients in Hong Kong were recruited in a knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) cross-sectional survey. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify predictors for two key outcomes-"initiation and advice" (ask and advise) and "follow-through" (assess, assist and arrange), based on the U.S. Agency for Health Care Policy Research framework. One thousand eight hundred forty-three (49.8%) nurses and 1,499 (66.4%) social workers responded. Nurses reported a much higher level of engagement in smoking cessation activities than social workers in all five steps of the AHCPR framework (P < 0.001). Nurses (mean score = 2.99 ± 0.40 on a 4-point Likert scale) had more positive attitudes to tobacco control and smoking cessation counseling compared to social workers (mean score = 2.79 ± 0.41; P < 0.001), whereas the latter group perceived themselves as more competent in handling such practice (mean score nurses = 2.36 ± 0.52, mean score social workers = 2.51 ± 0.39; P < 0.001). Both attitudinal and self-perceived competence scores predicted incremental gains in the likelihood of offering "follow-through" interventions in addition to those observed for "initiation and advice" actions. Our findings highlight a large degree of unmet need in Hong Kong's hospital-based nurses and social workers who work with the elderly regarding smoking cessation service provision and training. Future research should focus on developing and evaluating programs that encourage nurses and social workers to provide cessation interventions to exert a much greater collective impact than doctors can alone. © 2004 The Institute For Cancer Prevention and Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ypmeden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPreventive Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectNursesen_HK
dc.subjectSmoking cessation counselingen_HK
dc.subjectSocial workersen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnelen_HK
dc.subject.meshCounseling - standardsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Services - standardsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshNurses - standardsen_HK
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_HK
dc.subject.meshSmoking Cessationen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocial Work - standardsen_HK
dc.titleTraining nurses and social workers in smoking cessation counseling: A population needs assessment in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0091-7435&volume=40&spage=389&epage=406&date=2005&atitle=Training+nurses+and+social+workers+in+smoking+cessation+counseling:+a+population+needs+assessment+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJohnston, JM: jjohnsto@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, SSC: scsophia@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJohnston, JM=rp00375en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SSC=rp00423en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.07.008en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15530592-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-7644242769en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros96366en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-7644242769&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage389en_HK
dc.identifier.epage406en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000226036400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohnston, JM=7403397964en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SSC=7404255378en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SKK=24472757900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChi, I=7005697907en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

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