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Article: An overview of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-Cardiovascular Disease Subcohort (GBCS-CVD): A platform for multidisciplinary collaboration

TitleAn overview of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-Cardiovascular Disease Subcohort (GBCS-CVD): A platform for multidisciplinary collaboration
Authors
KeywordsArterial stiffness
Biobank
Carotid artery intima-media thickness
Cerebral artery stenoses
China
Cohort
Issue Date2010
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/jhh
Citation
Journal Of Human Hypertension, 2010, v. 24 n. 2, p. 139-150 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (GBCS, n=30 519, age ≥50 years) was established to examine the effects of genetic and environmental influences on health problems and chronic disease development. Guangzhou is undergoing massive economic development, but from a baseline that had remained unchanged for millennia. The Cardiovascular Disease Subcohort (GBCS-CVD) consists of 2000 participants who have been intensively phenotyped including a range of surrogate markers of vascular disease, including carotid artery intima-media thickness, cerebral artery stenoses, arterial stiffness, ankle-to-brachial blood pressure index and albuminuria, as well as coagulatory and inflammatory markers. Plasma and leukocytes are stored in liquid nitrogen for future studies. Preliminary demographic data show the female volunteers are younger than the male ones, but present with greater levels of adiposity including central obesity (31 vs 16%). Women had more body fat (33 vs 24%) and associated levels of adipokines. Despite this, body mass index and hip circumferences were similar, which contrasts with Caucasian populations. Men had more physician-diagnosed vascular disease (6.1 vs 2.5%), hypertension (42 vs 34%) and hyperglycaemia (36.6 vs 29.6%) than the women, but were less insulin resistant. In men, smoking (40 vs 2%) and drinking alcohol (67 vs 50%) was more common and they also had lower energy expenditures. The genotype distributions of the 15 typed single nucleotide polymorphisms were all in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. This article describes the rationale and methodology for the study. Given the comprehensive characterization of demographic and psychosocial determinants and biochemistry, the study provides a unique platform for multidisciplinary collaboration in a highly dynamic setting. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86476
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.833
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.167
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFC/RGC30518001/CO301070202
HKU720/05
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Education and Science
Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China
University of Birmingham, UK
Guangzhou Cohort Study-Cardiovascular Disease Subcohort (GBCS-CVD)
Funding Information:

This study was funded by an NSFC/RGC grant (30518001/CO301070202 and HKU720/05). The main cohort study was funded by The University of Hong Kong Foundation for Education and Science, Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, and Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China; and The University of Birmingham, UK. The Guangzhou Cohort Study-Cardiovascular Disease Subcohort (GBCS-CVD) investigators include: Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital: Jie Ming Lin, Bin Liu, Xiao Jun Yue, Chao Qiang Jiang (Co-PI); The University of Hong Kong: Tai Hing Lam (Co-PI); The Chinese University of Hong Kong: Brian Tomlinson, Ka Sing Wong; The University of Birmingham: Bernard MY Cheung, Shahrad Taheri, Paramjit Gill, Greg YH Lip, Kar Keung Cheng, G Neil Thomas (Co-PI).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorYue, XJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTomlinson, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, KSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:17:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:17:31Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Human Hypertension, 2010, v. 24 n. 2, p. 139-150en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0950-9240en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86476-
dc.description.abstractThe Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (GBCS, n=30 519, age ≥50 years) was established to examine the effects of genetic and environmental influences on health problems and chronic disease development. Guangzhou is undergoing massive economic development, but from a baseline that had remained unchanged for millennia. The Cardiovascular Disease Subcohort (GBCS-CVD) consists of 2000 participants who have been intensively phenotyped including a range of surrogate markers of vascular disease, including carotid artery intima-media thickness, cerebral artery stenoses, arterial stiffness, ankle-to-brachial blood pressure index and albuminuria, as well as coagulatory and inflammatory markers. Plasma and leukocytes are stored in liquid nitrogen for future studies. Preliminary demographic data show the female volunteers are younger than the male ones, but present with greater levels of adiposity including central obesity (31 vs 16%). Women had more body fat (33 vs 24%) and associated levels of adipokines. Despite this, body mass index and hip circumferences were similar, which contrasts with Caucasian populations. Men had more physician-diagnosed vascular disease (6.1 vs 2.5%), hypertension (42 vs 34%) and hyperglycaemia (36.6 vs 29.6%) than the women, but were less insulin resistant. In men, smoking (40 vs 2%) and drinking alcohol (67 vs 50%) was more common and they also had lower energy expenditures. The genotype distributions of the 15 typed single nucleotide polymorphisms were all in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. This article describes the rationale and methodology for the study. Given the comprehensive characterization of demographic and psychosocial determinants and biochemistry, the study provides a unique platform for multidisciplinary collaboration in a highly dynamic setting. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/jhhen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Human Hypertensionen_HK
dc.subjectArterial stiffnessen_HK
dc.subjectBiobanken_HK
dc.subjectCarotid artery intima-media thicknessen_HK
dc.subjectCerebral artery stenosesen_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectCohorten_HK
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshBiological Specimen Banks-
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics-
dc.subject.meshCooperative Behavior-
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Research Design-
dc.titleAn overview of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-Cardiovascular Disease Subcohort (GBCS-CVD): A platform for multidisciplinary collaborationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0950-9240&volume=24&issue=2&spage=139&epage=150&date=2010&atitle=An+overview+of+the+Guangzhou+biobank+cohort+study-cardiovascular+disease+subcohort+(GBCS-CVD):+a+platform+for+multidisciplinary+collaborationen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY:mycheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/jhh.2009.52en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19587700-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-75149121880en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros168734-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-75149121880&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage139en_HK
dc.identifier.epage150en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000273674800009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, JM=35409737900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, B=36079151900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYue, XJ=35410971600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTomlinson, B=16423466900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KS=7404759405en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BMY=7103294806en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5110144-

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