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Article: Personal versus interpersonal contributions to depressive symptoms among Hong Kong adolescents

TitlePersonal versus interpersonal contributions to depressive symptoms among Hong Kong adolescents
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00207594.asp
Citation
International Journal Of Psychology, 2003, v. 38 n. 3, p. 160-169 How to Cite?
AbstractCross-cultural theory proposes that an essential distinction between cultures lies in the extent to which individual members see themselves as either independent agents preferentially valuing agency and efficacy, or as embedded within a social context preferentially valuing interpersonal relationships. A nonreferred sample of 605 boys and 503 girls from Hong Kong provided information regarding: (1) perceptions of their personal self-efficacy or beliefs regarding their own ability to master challenges they face; (2) the degree of harmony in their interpersonal (peer and family) relationships; and (3) depressive symptoms as an assessment of their mood. Cognitive theories of emotions propose that both the individual's assessment of his/her self-efficacy and of his/her relationships influence mood. Hypotheses, based on cross-cultural theory, were that in this collective culture, interpersonal evaluations would predict more of the variance in mood than would personal self-efficacy. Contrary to Western sex-differences literature, it was predicted that the effect of interpersonal harmony on mood would be equally pronounced for girls and for boys. Structural equation modelling was used to test causal models. Consistent with findings from the West, evaluations of personal self-efficacy as well as interpersonal relationship harmony were significantly associated with depressed mood. Consistent with cultural theory, interpersonal relationship harmony was more strongly associated with mood than was personal self-efficacy for the entire sample of adolescents. In contrast to findings of sex differences in the salience of relationships in the West, the prediction of interpersonal relationships to mood was equal for boys and girls in Hong Kong. This preliminary study extends models of cognitive concomitants of mood disruption to a non-Western culture, and provides a framework to understand relative contributors to mood in adolescence. The findings tentatively suggest that treatment for depressive mood in Chinese populations should prioritize enhancement of the perceived quality of interpersonal relationships over increasing a sense of mastery.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86415
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.276
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.552
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStewart, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorByrne, BMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, PWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKennard, BDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEmslle, Gen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:16:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:16:43Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Psychology, 2003, v. 38 n. 3, p. 160-169en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0020-7594en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86415-
dc.description.abstractCross-cultural theory proposes that an essential distinction between cultures lies in the extent to which individual members see themselves as either independent agents preferentially valuing agency and efficacy, or as embedded within a social context preferentially valuing interpersonal relationships. A nonreferred sample of 605 boys and 503 girls from Hong Kong provided information regarding: (1) perceptions of their personal self-efficacy or beliefs regarding their own ability to master challenges they face; (2) the degree of harmony in their interpersonal (peer and family) relationships; and (3) depressive symptoms as an assessment of their mood. Cognitive theories of emotions propose that both the individual's assessment of his/her self-efficacy and of his/her relationships influence mood. Hypotheses, based on cross-cultural theory, were that in this collective culture, interpersonal evaluations would predict more of the variance in mood than would personal self-efficacy. Contrary to Western sex-differences literature, it was predicted that the effect of interpersonal harmony on mood would be equally pronounced for girls and for boys. Structural equation modelling was used to test causal models. Consistent with findings from the West, evaluations of personal self-efficacy as well as interpersonal relationship harmony were significantly associated with depressed mood. Consistent with cultural theory, interpersonal relationship harmony was more strongly associated with mood than was personal self-efficacy for the entire sample of adolescents. In contrast to findings of sex differences in the salience of relationships in the West, the prediction of interpersonal relationships to mood was equal for boys and girls in Hong Kong. This preliminary study extends models of cognitive concomitants of mood disruption to a non-Western culture, and provides a framework to understand relative contributors to mood in adolescence. The findings tentatively suggest that treatment for depressive mood in Chinese populations should prioritize enhancement of the perceived quality of interpersonal relationships over increasing a sense of mastery.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00207594.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Psychologyen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Psychology. Copyright © Psychology Press.en_HK
dc.titlePersonal versus interpersonal contributions to depressive symptoms among Hong Kong adolescentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0020-7594&volume=38&issue=3&spage=160&epage=169&date=2003&atitle=Personal+versus+interpersonal+contributions+to+depressive+symptoms+among+Hong+Kong+adolescentsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM:lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00207590244000313en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0141432170en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros83344en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0141432170&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage160en_HK
dc.identifier.epage169en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000185003700004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStewart, SM=35460013800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridByrne, BM=7101731001en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, PWH=7406120357en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKennard, BD=35433973300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHughes, C=7401857260en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEmslle, G=6504501602en_HK

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