File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Storm damage on urban trees in Guangzhou, China

TitleStorm damage on urban trees in Guangzhou, China
Authors
KeywordsGuangzhou
Storm damage
Tree management
Urban forest
Urban tree
Issue Date1997
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/landurbplan
Citation
Landscape And Urban Planning, 1997, v. 38 n. 1-2, p. 45-59 How to Cite?
AbstractGuangzhou is the largest city in subtropical South China with a significant tree cover and a long history of urban greening. Its precious tree stock is subject to a wide range of natural and artificial stresses, one of which is strong wind associated with thunderstorms and typhoons. On 9 April 1995, a windstorm of extreme intensity struck the city and brought havoc to the tree population. A detailed survey was conducted immediately after the storm to collect quantitative information on 1782 trees encompassing 89.5% of the total spoiled-tree population. The study was aimed at understanding the nature and extent of wind damage on urban trees with reference to species, dimension (age), site characteristics, land use and urban history. A brief review of tree composition, habitat conditions and tree management responsibilities in the city, and a computer inventory on urban trees established earlier, provided a benchmark for data interpretation. Damage was generally independent of size despite the conspicuous loss of some large and champion-calibre specimens. Tree size, however, was related to the mode of damage. Ten species constituted the bulk of the destruction. Roadsides and green spaces had somewhat different assemblages of afflicted species. Recent widespread construction activities had weakened many street trees and predisposed them to injuries. Old districts with more old trees were more seriously affected. North districts which registered much stronger winds took up over 80% of the toll. Different phases of management responses to the natural disaster and the related administrative organization were assessed. Management implications of the findings were discussed with a view of rationalizing responses and reducing future wind damage.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86386
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.654
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.699
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HHTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:16:11Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:16:11Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLandscape And Urban Planning, 1997, v. 38 n. 1-2, p. 45-59en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0169-2046en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86386-
dc.description.abstractGuangzhou is the largest city in subtropical South China with a significant tree cover and a long history of urban greening. Its precious tree stock is subject to a wide range of natural and artificial stresses, one of which is strong wind associated with thunderstorms and typhoons. On 9 April 1995, a windstorm of extreme intensity struck the city and brought havoc to the tree population. A detailed survey was conducted immediately after the storm to collect quantitative information on 1782 trees encompassing 89.5% of the total spoiled-tree population. The study was aimed at understanding the nature and extent of wind damage on urban trees with reference to species, dimension (age), site characteristics, land use and urban history. A brief review of tree composition, habitat conditions and tree management responsibilities in the city, and a computer inventory on urban trees established earlier, provided a benchmark for data interpretation. Damage was generally independent of size despite the conspicuous loss of some large and champion-calibre specimens. Tree size, however, was related to the mode of damage. Ten species constituted the bulk of the destruction. Roadsides and green spaces had somewhat different assemblages of afflicted species. Recent widespread construction activities had weakened many street trees and predisposed them to injuries. Old districts with more old trees were more seriously affected. North districts which registered much stronger winds took up over 80% of the toll. Different phases of management responses to the natural disaster and the related administrative organization were assessed. Management implications of the findings were discussed with a view of rationalizing responses and reducing future wind damage.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/landurbplanen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLandscape and Urban Planningen_HK
dc.rightsLandscape and Urban Planning. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectGuangzhouen_HK
dc.subjectStorm damageen_HK
dc.subjectTree managementen_HK
dc.subjectUrban foresten_HK
dc.subjectUrban treeen_HK
dc.titleStorm damage on urban trees in Guangzhou, Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0169-2046&volume=38&spage=45&epage=59&date=1997&atitle=Storm+damage+on+urban+trees+in+Guangzhou,+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY:hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0169-2046(97)00018-2en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031448805en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros33823en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031448805&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage45en_HK
dc.identifier.epage59en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997YK29700005-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, HHT=7409751779en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats