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Article: Regional governance of port development in China: A case study of Shanghai International Shipping Center

TitleRegional governance of port development in China: A case study of Shanghai International Shipping Center
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03088839.asp
Citation
Maritime Policy And Management, 2004, v. 31 n. 4, p. 357-373 How to Cite?
AbstractWhen China enters the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and becomes more involved in the global economy, her major seaports will be pivotal places where the international shipping and terminal operators interact, conflict and co-operate with the local and the central governments. To demonstrate and understand these interactions, this article analyzes the case of the Yangtze River Delta (YRD), where the competition, co-operation and governance of Shanghai and Ningbo, the two largest ports on Chinese mainland, concern all stakeholders from the central and local governments of China to the container terminal operators and shipping lines overseas. This paper first develops a conceptual framework for analyzing port development in a regional context. The article then introduces the case of the Shanghai International Shipping Center with a focus on the efforts of the Shanghai Government to establish a regional hub port, which also involves two nearby provinces. This case study reveals the course of the decision-making processes and the power networks currently governing the port development in the YRD. Two domains of port governance are discussed: the role of port authorities in port internal governance, and the crucial influences of local and central governments on the port external governance. It provides evidence that the power of shipping lines and international terminal operators are not as prevalent as in many ports in western countries. It is suggested that the lack of good regional port governance in the region is due to structural problems in administration. © 2004 Taylor & Francis Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86361
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.22
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.501
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, JJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSlack, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:15:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:15:54Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMaritime Policy And Management, 2004, v. 31 n. 4, p. 357-373en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0308-8839en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86361-
dc.description.abstractWhen China enters the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and becomes more involved in the global economy, her major seaports will be pivotal places where the international shipping and terminal operators interact, conflict and co-operate with the local and the central governments. To demonstrate and understand these interactions, this article analyzes the case of the Yangtze River Delta (YRD), where the competition, co-operation and governance of Shanghai and Ningbo, the two largest ports on Chinese mainland, concern all stakeholders from the central and local governments of China to the container terminal operators and shipping lines overseas. This paper first develops a conceptual framework for analyzing port development in a regional context. The article then introduces the case of the Shanghai International Shipping Center with a focus on the efforts of the Shanghai Government to establish a regional hub port, which also involves two nearby provinces. This case study reveals the course of the decision-making processes and the power networks currently governing the port development in the YRD. Two domains of port governance are discussed: the role of port authorities in port internal governance, and the crucial influences of local and central governments on the port external governance. It provides evidence that the power of shipping lines and international terminal operators are not as prevalent as in many ports in western countries. It is suggested that the lack of good regional port governance in the region is due to structural problems in administration. © 2004 Taylor & Francis Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03088839.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMaritime Policy and Managementen_HK
dc.titleRegional governance of port development in China: A case study of Shanghai International Shipping Centeren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0308-8839&volume=31&issue=4&spage=357&epage=373&date=2004&atitle=Regional+governance+of+port+development+in+China:+A+case+study+of+Shanghai+International+Shipping+Centeren_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, JJ:jwang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, JJ=rp00648en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0308883042000304467en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-11244257301en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros106709en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-11244257301&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume31en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage357en_HK
dc.identifier.epage373en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, JJ=7701342886en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSlack, B=7006403059en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3021081-

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