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Article: Public perception and behavior change in relationship to hot weather and air pollution

TitlePublic perception and behavior change in relationship to hot weather and air pollution
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envres
Citation
Environmental Research, 2008, v. 107 n. 3, p. 401-411 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Changes in climate systems are increasing heat wave frequency and air stagnation, both conditions associated with exacerbating poor air quality and of considerable public health concern. Objectives: Heat and air pollution advisory systems are in place in many cities for early detection and response to reduce health consequences, or severity of adverse conditions. Whereas the ability to forecast heat waves and/or air pollution episodes has become increasingly sophisticated and accurate, little is known about the effectiveness of advisories in altering public behavior. Methods: Air quality and meteorological conditions were measured during advisory and control days in Portland, OR and Houston, TX in 2005 and 2006 and 1962 subjects were interviewed by telephone about their perception and response to these conditions. Results: Elevated ambient temperatures were accurately recognized regardless of air conditioning use; in Portland, respondents resorted to active cooling behavior (AC, fan, etc.), while in Houston no such change was observed. More heat-related symptoms were reported in Portland compared to Houston, probably due to low air conditioning use in the northwest. One-third of study participants were aware of air quality advisories but only ∼10-15% claimed to have changed activities during such an episode. Not the advisory, however, drove their behavior change, but rather the perception of poor air quality, which was not related to PM 2.5 or ozone measurements. Conclusions: Messages are not reaching the public during potentially hazardous weather and air quality conditions. Climatic forecasts are increasingly predictive but public agencies fail to mount an appropriate outreach response. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86333
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.088
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.452
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSemenza, JCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWilson, DJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorParra, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBontempo, BDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHart, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorSailor, DJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, LAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:15:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:15:34Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Research, 2008, v. 107 n. 3, p. 401-411en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0013-9351en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86333-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Changes in climate systems are increasing heat wave frequency and air stagnation, both conditions associated with exacerbating poor air quality and of considerable public health concern. Objectives: Heat and air pollution advisory systems are in place in many cities for early detection and response to reduce health consequences, or severity of adverse conditions. Whereas the ability to forecast heat waves and/or air pollution episodes has become increasingly sophisticated and accurate, little is known about the effectiveness of advisories in altering public behavior. Methods: Air quality and meteorological conditions were measured during advisory and control days in Portland, OR and Houston, TX in 2005 and 2006 and 1962 subjects were interviewed by telephone about their perception and response to these conditions. Results: Elevated ambient temperatures were accurately recognized regardless of air conditioning use; in Portland, respondents resorted to active cooling behavior (AC, fan, etc.), while in Houston no such change was observed. More heat-related symptoms were reported in Portland compared to Houston, probably due to low air conditioning use in the northwest. One-third of study participants were aware of air quality advisories but only ∼10-15% claimed to have changed activities during such an episode. Not the advisory, however, drove their behavior change, but rather the perception of poor air quality, which was not related to PM 2.5 or ozone measurements. Conclusions: Messages are not reaching the public during potentially hazardous weather and air quality conditions. Climatic forecasts are increasingly predictive but public agencies fail to mount an appropriate outreach response. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Researchen_HK
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshBehavior - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshData Collectionen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHot Temperatureen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshOzone - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshParticulate Matter - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshPerception - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshUnited Statesen_HK
dc.subject.meshWeatheren_HK
dc.titlePublic perception and behavior change in relationship to hot weather and air pollutionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0013-9351&volume=107&spage=401&epage=411&date=2008&atitle=Public+perception+and+behavior+change+in+relationship+to+hot+weather+and+air+pollutionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHart, M:mhart@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHart, M=rp00645en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envres.2008.03.005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18466894-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-44649197103en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros150574en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-44649197103&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume107en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage401en_HK
dc.identifier.epage411en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000256961000014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSemenza, JC=6603967387en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilson, DJ=35481545900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridParra, J=24169157500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBontempo, BD=15829183400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHart, M=15044213100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSailor, DJ=7003306487en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGeorge, LA=7102942529en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7753365-

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