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Article: Soil recovery from human disturbance in tropical woodlands in Hong Kong

TitleSoil recovery from human disturbance in tropical woodlands in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsSecondary succession
Soil degradation
Soil management
Soil recovery
Tropical woodland
Issue Date2003
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/catena
Citation
Catena, 2003, v. 52 n. 2, p. 85-103 How to Cite?
AbstractVillages in the countryside hinterland of Hong Kong traditionally preserve small remnant woodlands for utilitarian and spiritual reasons. In the territory, these remnants often furnish the most natural ecosystems with rich biodiversity. Some sites have been preserved, whereas others have been subject to different uses, and subsequently secondary woodland has reestablished. This study evaluates woodland and human influences on soil properties, and soil recovery after woodland rejuvenation. At nine sites, four classified as less disturbed (LD) and five as more disturbed (MD), physical and chemical properties are similar to those of impoverished humid-tropical soils. However, the MD samples have greater stone content and aggregate stability than the LD. MD samples also have higher pH, lower C/N ratios, more exchangeable Ca and Mg, and higher base saturation. The MD soil properties are attributed to tree felling in the 1940s and short-lived conversion to farmland or orchard, followed by secondary woodland succession dominated by native broadleaf trees. Two MD sites, one converted to an urban park in 1970 and the other burnt by a severe hill fire in 1999, have soil imprints of drastic disturbance. The nutrient content of MD soils at this early stage of ecosystem succession suggests rapid accumulation of nutrients. Five decades of secondary succession at three of the MD sites have resulted in natural soil rehabilitation. Conservation of these ecologically valuable woodlands should avoid unnecessary silvicultural inputs such as planting exotic species and soil disturbance, and conversion to unnatural uses such as recreational sites. In addition, the soils should be managed for improvement to help ecosystem recuperation. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86327
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.612
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.191
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:15:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:15:30Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCatena, 2003, v. 52 n. 2, p. 85-103en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0341-8162en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86327-
dc.description.abstractVillages in the countryside hinterland of Hong Kong traditionally preserve small remnant woodlands for utilitarian and spiritual reasons. In the territory, these remnants often furnish the most natural ecosystems with rich biodiversity. Some sites have been preserved, whereas others have been subject to different uses, and subsequently secondary woodland has reestablished. This study evaluates woodland and human influences on soil properties, and soil recovery after woodland rejuvenation. At nine sites, four classified as less disturbed (LD) and five as more disturbed (MD), physical and chemical properties are similar to those of impoverished humid-tropical soils. However, the MD samples have greater stone content and aggregate stability than the LD. MD samples also have higher pH, lower C/N ratios, more exchangeable Ca and Mg, and higher base saturation. The MD soil properties are attributed to tree felling in the 1940s and short-lived conversion to farmland or orchard, followed by secondary woodland succession dominated by native broadleaf trees. Two MD sites, one converted to an urban park in 1970 and the other burnt by a severe hill fire in 1999, have soil imprints of drastic disturbance. The nutrient content of MD soils at this early stage of ecosystem succession suggests rapid accumulation of nutrients. Five decades of secondary succession at three of the MD sites have resulted in natural soil rehabilitation. Conservation of these ecologically valuable woodlands should avoid unnecessary silvicultural inputs such as planting exotic species and soil disturbance, and conversion to unnatural uses such as recreational sites. In addition, the soils should be managed for improvement to help ecosystem recuperation. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/catenaen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCatenaen_HK
dc.rightsCatena. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectSecondary successionen_HK
dc.subjectSoil degradationen_HK
dc.subjectSoil managementen_HK
dc.subjectSoil recoveryen_HK
dc.subjectTropical woodlanden_HK
dc.titleSoil recovery from human disturbance in tropical woodlands in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0341-8162&volume=52&spage=85&epage=103&date=2003&atitle=Soil+recovery+from+human+disturbance+in+tropical+woodlands+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY:hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0341-8162(02)00195-9en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037691438en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros80663en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037691438&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume52en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage85en_HK
dc.identifier.epage103en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000182948200001-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_HK

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