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Article: Old stone walls as an ecological habitat for urban trees in Hong Kong

TitleOld stone walls as an ecological habitat for urban trees in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsHong Kong
Stone wall
Urban ecology
Urban tree
Wall preservation
Wall tree
Issue Date1998
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/landurbplan
Citation
Landscape And Urban Planning, 1998, v. 42 n. 1, p. 29-43 How to Cite?
AbstractUrban growth in Hong Kong is constrained by ragged topography resulting in grave shortage of developable land. Besides forming new land by reclamation from the sea, hillsides have been extensively cut into terraces to accommodate densely-packed roads and buildings. To maximize useable area and to provide geotechnical stability, stone retaining walls were widely built between platforms. Such vertical habitats constitute a unique opportunity for spontaneous colonization by a diversified humid-tropical flora, including large trees up to 20 m tall. The walls-cum-vegetation, many exceeding 100 years old, furnish a precious natural-cum-cultural heritage and decorate some otherwise drab neighborhoods. Recent city redevelopment unfortunately has damaged beautiful walls and their living companions. A city-wide survey was conducted to establish a microcomputer database to assess wall and tree characteristics and to identify candidates for conservation. Some 505 walls with 1275 trees (>1 m tall) were found mainly in residential areas. A broad range of stone types, wall dimensions, construction methods and wall age were recorded. The 30 tree species, largely native, are dominated by Moraceae (Mulberry family), eight of which contribute 88% of the population. About 10% of the trees are >9 m tall, providing conspicuous and pleasant landscape elements. Some tree attributes are associated with wall characteristics. Many trees had been heavily pruned to meet vehicular clearance needs and perceived safety concerns. The absence of an official policy to preserve champion-caliber trees and walls need to be urgently rectified to prevent further loss of an irreplaceable community asset.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86305
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.654
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.699
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:15:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:15:15Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLandscape And Urban Planning, 1998, v. 42 n. 1, p. 29-43en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0169-2046en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86305-
dc.description.abstractUrban growth in Hong Kong is constrained by ragged topography resulting in grave shortage of developable land. Besides forming new land by reclamation from the sea, hillsides have been extensively cut into terraces to accommodate densely-packed roads and buildings. To maximize useable area and to provide geotechnical stability, stone retaining walls were widely built between platforms. Such vertical habitats constitute a unique opportunity for spontaneous colonization by a diversified humid-tropical flora, including large trees up to 20 m tall. The walls-cum-vegetation, many exceeding 100 years old, furnish a precious natural-cum-cultural heritage and decorate some otherwise drab neighborhoods. Recent city redevelopment unfortunately has damaged beautiful walls and their living companions. A city-wide survey was conducted to establish a microcomputer database to assess wall and tree characteristics and to identify candidates for conservation. Some 505 walls with 1275 trees (>1 m tall) were found mainly in residential areas. A broad range of stone types, wall dimensions, construction methods and wall age were recorded. The 30 tree species, largely native, are dominated by Moraceae (Mulberry family), eight of which contribute 88% of the population. About 10% of the trees are >9 m tall, providing conspicuous and pleasant landscape elements. Some tree attributes are associated with wall characteristics. Many trees had been heavily pruned to meet vehicular clearance needs and perceived safety concerns. The absence of an official policy to preserve champion-caliber trees and walls need to be urgently rectified to prevent further loss of an irreplaceable community asset.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/landurbplanen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLandscape and Urban Planningen_HK
dc.rightsLandscape and Urban Planning. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectStone wallen_HK
dc.subjectUrban ecologyen_HK
dc.subjectUrban treeen_HK
dc.subjectWall preservationen_HK
dc.subjectWall treeen_HK
dc.titleOld stone walls as an ecological habitat for urban trees in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0169-2046&volume=42&spage=29&epage=43&date=1998&atitle=Old+stone+walls+as+an+ecological+habitat+for+urban+trees+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY:hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0169-2046(98)00072-3en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032563254en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros42872en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032563254&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume42en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage29en_HK
dc.identifier.epage43en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000075433000003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3038118-

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