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Article: Climate change, social unrest and dynastic transition in ancient China

TitleClimate change, social unrest and dynastic transition in ancient China
Authors
KeywordsClimatic change
Dynastic cycle
Social unrest
Temperature anomaly
War
Issue Date2005
PublisherScience China Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springerlink.com/content/1001-6538/
Citation
Chinese Science Bulletin, 2005, v. 50 n. 2, p. 137-144 How to Cite?
AbstractThe evident connection between human evolution and climatic changes has been concurred by scientists. Although many people are trying to forecast the impacts of climatic changes on our future society, there are not any studies to quantitatively scrutinize the interrelation between climatic changes and social developments by using historical data. In line with this knowledge gap, this study adopted a scientific approach to compare the paleoclimatic records with the historical data of wars, social unrests, and dynastic transitions in China spanned from the late Tang to Qing Dynasties. Results showed that war frequency in cold phases was much higher than that in mild phases. Besides, 70%-80% of war peaks and most of the dynastic transitions and nationwide social unrests in China took place in cold phases. This phenomenon could be attributed to the diminishing thermal energy input in cold phases resulting in the fall of land-productivity and hence, the deficiency of livelihood resources across society. Accompanied with certain social circumstances, this kind of ecological stress was transformed into wars and social unrests, followed by dynastic transitions in most of the cases. By closer examination, it was even found that war frequency was negatively correlated with temperature anomaly series. As land carrying capacities vary from one climatic zone to another, the magnitude of war-temperature association also differed among different geographic regions. It is suggested that climatic change was one of the most important factors in determining the dynastic cycle and alternation of war and peace in ancient China.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86286
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.789
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorJim, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHe, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, Fen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:15:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:15:02Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChinese Science Bulletin, 2005, v. 50 n. 2, p. 137-144en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1001-6538en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86286-
dc.description.abstractThe evident connection between human evolution and climatic changes has been concurred by scientists. Although many people are trying to forecast the impacts of climatic changes on our future society, there are not any studies to quantitatively scrutinize the interrelation between climatic changes and social developments by using historical data. In line with this knowledge gap, this study adopted a scientific approach to compare the paleoclimatic records with the historical data of wars, social unrests, and dynastic transitions in China spanned from the late Tang to Qing Dynasties. Results showed that war frequency in cold phases was much higher than that in mild phases. Besides, 70%-80% of war peaks and most of the dynastic transitions and nationwide social unrests in China took place in cold phases. This phenomenon could be attributed to the diminishing thermal energy input in cold phases resulting in the fall of land-productivity and hence, the deficiency of livelihood resources across society. Accompanied with certain social circumstances, this kind of ecological stress was transformed into wars and social unrests, followed by dynastic transitions in most of the cases. By closer examination, it was even found that war frequency was negatively correlated with temperature anomaly series. As land carrying capacities vary from one climatic zone to another, the magnitude of war-temperature association also differed among different geographic regions. It is suggested that climatic change was one of the most important factors in determining the dynastic cycle and alternation of war and peace in ancient China.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherScience China Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springerlink.com/content/1001-6538/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Science Bulletinen_HK
dc.subjectClimatic changeen_HK
dc.subjectDynastic cycleen_HK
dc.subjectSocial unresten_HK
dc.subjectTemperature anomalyen_HK
dc.subjectWaren_HK
dc.titleClimate change, social unrest and dynastic transition in ancient Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1001-6538&volume=50&issue=2&spage=137&epage=144&date=2005&atitle=Climate+Change,+Social+Unrest+and+Dynastic+Transition+in+Ancient+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhang, D: zhangd@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailJim, C: hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLin, C: gcslin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, F: harry.lee@graduate.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, D=rp00649en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJim, C=rp00549en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLin, C=rp00609en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, F=rp00646en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1360/03wd0641en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33745397141en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros103965en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros119291-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33745397141&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume50en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage137en_HK
dc.identifier.epage144en_HK
dc.publisher.placeChinaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, D=9732911600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, C=7006143750en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, C=7401699741en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, Y=7404942217en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, F=9243348000en_HK
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130423-

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