File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Floristics, performance and prognosis of historical trees in the urban forest of Guangzhou City (China)

TitleFloristics, performance and prognosis of historical trees in the urban forest of Guangzhou City (China)
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0167-6369
Citation
Environmental Monitoring And Assessment, 2005, v. 102 n. 1-3, p. 285-308 How to Cite?
AbstractOutstanding historical trees embedded in cities constitute pertinent environmental assets, yet they are widely threatened in third-world cities. Inadequate understanding of this valuable natural-cum-cultural heritage hinders proper conservation. A case study of Guangzhou in south China evaluated floristic composition, age profile and biomass structure of historical trees, assessed their performance in major habitats (institutional, park and roadside), and established a prognosis for future growth and management. The 348 historical trees examined belonged to only 25 species, vis-à-vis 254 trees in the entire urban forest, dominated by five species and native members. Roadside had more trees, followed by institutional and park, with merely the most common four species shared by all habitats. The limited commonality reflected tree-performance differentiation by habitats exerting selection pressure on species. The institutional growth-regime was more conducive to nurturing high-caliber specimens, whereas park is less capable. Individual species achievement by habitats, derived from tree-count ranking and relative-abundance indices, could inform species choice and tree conservation. Few trees exceeded 300 years of age in the millennium-old city, echoing a history of intense tree-city conflicts. Potential life-span, trunk and crown diameters indicated ample opportunities for further expansion of biomass and landscape impacts, which would be straitjacketed by the tightening urban fabric. © Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86283
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.633
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.634
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:15:00Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:15:00Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Monitoring And Assessment, 2005, v. 102 n. 1-3, p. 285-308en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0167-6369en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86283-
dc.description.abstractOutstanding historical trees embedded in cities constitute pertinent environmental assets, yet they are widely threatened in third-world cities. Inadequate understanding of this valuable natural-cum-cultural heritage hinders proper conservation. A case study of Guangzhou in south China evaluated floristic composition, age profile and biomass structure of historical trees, assessed their performance in major habitats (institutional, park and roadside), and established a prognosis for future growth and management. The 348 historical trees examined belonged to only 25 species, vis-à-vis 254 trees in the entire urban forest, dominated by five species and native members. Roadside had more trees, followed by institutional and park, with merely the most common four species shared by all habitats. The limited commonality reflected tree-performance differentiation by habitats exerting selection pressure on species. The institutional growth-regime was more conducive to nurturing high-caliber specimens, whereas park is less capable. Individual species achievement by habitats, derived from tree-count ranking and relative-abundance indices, could inform species choice and tree conservation. Few trees exceeded 300 years of age in the millennium-old city, echoing a history of intense tree-city conflicts. Potential life-span, trunk and crown diameters indicated ample opportunities for further expansion of biomass and landscape impacts, which would be straitjacketed by the tightening urban fabric. © Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0167-6369en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Monitoring and Assessmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshBiomassen_HK
dc.subject.meshChinaen_HK
dc.subject.meshCitiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshConservation of Natural Resources - trendsen_HK
dc.subject.meshEcologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnvironmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshEnvironment Design - trendsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTrees - classification - growth & developmenten_HK
dc.titleFloristics, performance and prognosis of historical trees in the urban forest of Guangzhou City (China)en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0167-6369&volume=102&spage=285&epage=308&date=2005&atitle=Floristics,+Performance+and+Prognosis+of+Historical+Trees+in+the+Urban+Forest+of+Guangzhou+City+(China)en_HK
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY:hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10661-005-6028-0en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15869191-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-15744380380en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros103963en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-15744380380&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume102en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage285en_HK
dc.identifier.epage308en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000227734200018-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike145525-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats