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Article: Perceiving desertification from the lay perspective in northern China

TitlePerceiving desertification from the lay perspective in northern China
Authors
KeywordsChina
Desertification
Gansu
Lay public
Minqin
Perceptions
Issue Date2004
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/ldr
Citation
Land Degradation And Development, 2004, v. 15 n. 6, p. 529-542 How to Cite?
AbstractIn recent years it has become increasingly recognized that resolving desertification is better achieved by winning over the local population than by imposing an 'expert' solution from above. However, little research has so far been conducted into the environmental perceptions of the general public in China. This study aimed to contribute to this important area of research by empirically exploring the lay public's environmental perceptions regarding desertification in Minqin County in Gansu Province, northern China. The study adopted as its theoretical underpinnings Zube and Sell's Process Model of the Perception of, and Response to, Environmental Change (1986). The primary data was collected via a questionnaire survey (n = 1138) administered between 14 and 31 December 2002. The major findings of the questionnaire survey were: (1) although many respondents were aware of desertification, they did not fully understand the various issues involved; (2) respondents' perceptions of desertification were significantly affected by their personal attributes; and (3) there was a considerable difference in the way in which desertification in Minqin County was perceived by experts and laymen respectively. As far as the policy implications of these findings are concerned, two approaches are essential to encourage self-motivated social participation to resolve desertification in Minqin County: (1) the different perceptions of laymen and experts of the problem must be addressed at the outset in the formulation of any desertification-mitigating policies; and (2) any attempts to educate the lay public should not assume the existence of a homogenous community of like-minded people. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86268
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.145
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.113
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, HFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, DDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:14:49Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:14:49Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLand Degradation And Development, 2004, v. 15 n. 6, p. 529-542en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1085-3278en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86268-
dc.description.abstractIn recent years it has become increasingly recognized that resolving desertification is better achieved by winning over the local population than by imposing an 'expert' solution from above. However, little research has so far been conducted into the environmental perceptions of the general public in China. This study aimed to contribute to this important area of research by empirically exploring the lay public's environmental perceptions regarding desertification in Minqin County in Gansu Province, northern China. The study adopted as its theoretical underpinnings Zube and Sell's Process Model of the Perception of, and Response to, Environmental Change (1986). The primary data was collected via a questionnaire survey (n = 1138) administered between 14 and 31 December 2002. The major findings of the questionnaire survey were: (1) although many respondents were aware of desertification, they did not fully understand the various issues involved; (2) respondents' perceptions of desertification were significantly affected by their personal attributes; and (3) there was a considerable difference in the way in which desertification in Minqin County was perceived by experts and laymen respectively. As far as the policy implications of these findings are concerned, two approaches are essential to encourage self-motivated social participation to resolve desertification in Minqin County: (1) the different perceptions of laymen and experts of the problem must be addressed at the outset in the formulation of any desertification-mitigating policies; and (2) any attempts to educate the lay public should not assume the existence of a homogenous community of like-minded people. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/ldren_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLand Degradation and Developmenten_HK
dc.rightsLand Degradation and Development. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectDesertificationen_HK
dc.subjectGansuen_HK
dc.subjectLay publicen_HK
dc.subjectMinqinen_HK
dc.subjectPerceptionsen_HK
dc.titlePerceiving desertification from the lay perspective in northern Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1085-3278&volume=15&spage=529&epage=542&date=2004&atitle=Perceiving+desertification+from+the+lay+perspective+in+Northern+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, HF:harry.lee@graduate.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhang, DD:zhangd@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, HF=rp00646en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, DD=rp00649en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ldr.638en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-11844298440en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros106294en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-11844298440&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume15en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage529en_HK
dc.identifier.epage542en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000226523800001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, HF=9243348000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, DD=9732911600en_HK

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