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Article: Perceiving land-degrading activities from the lay perspective in northern China

TitlePerceiving land-degrading activities from the lay perspective in northern China
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00267/
Citation
Environmental Management, 2005, v. 36 n. 5, p. 711-725 How to Cite?
AbstractInvestigation into local peoples' perceptions can produce useful information that could be incorporated into the decision-making process to help resolve environmental problems. Within the arena of land degradation, a number of studies have also been conducted to explore local peoples' views of the problem. However, the perceptions of land-degrading practices of the general public have so far not been actively solicited. This study aimed to contribute to this area of research by adopting the psychometric scaling technique to empirically explore the lay public's ecological risk perceptions of land-degrading activities in Minqin County in Gansu Province, northern China. The primary data were collected via a questionnaire survey (n = 1,138) administered between 14 and 31 December 2002. The major findings of the survey were: (1) Respondents perceived the ecological risks posed by different land-degrading activities to be different. (2) There was a considerable incongruence in the way in which mining of groundwater was conceived by experts and laymen, respectively. (3) Respondents were pretty unsure of expert knowledge. (4) Respondents' ecological risk perceptions were significantly affected by their personal attributes. As far as the policy implications of these findings are concerned, this study accentuates that we must be aware of, and involved in, the environmental perceptions of the lay public in order to succeed in guiding any human-environment tensions along more sustainable trajectories and navigating the transition to sustainability. © 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86218
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.857
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.830
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, HFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, DDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:14:14Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:14:14Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Management, 2005, v. 36 n. 5, p. 711-725en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0364-152Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86218-
dc.description.abstractInvestigation into local peoples' perceptions can produce useful information that could be incorporated into the decision-making process to help resolve environmental problems. Within the arena of land degradation, a number of studies have also been conducted to explore local peoples' views of the problem. However, the perceptions of land-degrading practices of the general public have so far not been actively solicited. This study aimed to contribute to this area of research by adopting the psychometric scaling technique to empirically explore the lay public's ecological risk perceptions of land-degrading activities in Minqin County in Gansu Province, northern China. The primary data were collected via a questionnaire survey (n = 1,138) administered between 14 and 31 December 2002. The major findings of the survey were: (1) Respondents perceived the ecological risks posed by different land-degrading activities to be different. (2) There was a considerable incongruence in the way in which mining of groundwater was conceived by experts and laymen, respectively. (3) Respondents were pretty unsure of expert knowledge. (4) Respondents' ecological risk perceptions were significantly affected by their personal attributes. As far as the policy implications of these findings are concerned, this study accentuates that we must be aware of, and involved in, the environmental perceptions of the lay public in order to succeed in guiding any human-environment tensions along more sustainable trajectories and navigating the transition to sustainability. © 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00267/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Managementen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgricultureen_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitudeen_HK
dc.subject.meshChinaen_HK
dc.subject.meshConservation of Natural Resourcesen_HK
dc.subject.meshDecision Makingen_HK
dc.subject.meshEcosystemen_HK
dc.subject.meshExpert Testimonyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFresh Wateren_HK
dc.subject.meshPublic Opinionen_HK
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisken_HK
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshWater Supplyen_HK
dc.titlePerceiving land-degrading activities from the lay perspective in northern Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0364-152X&volume=36&issue=5&spage=711&epage=725&date=2005&atitle=Perceiving+land-degrading+activities+from+the+lay+perspective+in+northern+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, HF:harry.lee@graduate.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhang, DD:zhangd@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, HF=rp00646en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, DD=rp00649en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00267-004-0218-3en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16206023-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27744573435en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros157763en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-27744573435&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage711en_HK
dc.identifier.epage725en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232979900009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, HF=9243348000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, DD=9732911600en_HK

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