File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Land use, runoff, erosion and their control: a review for southern China

TitleLand use, runoff, erosion and their control: a review for southern China
Authors
KeywordsChina
Erosion control
Land use
Man-environment relations
Runoff
Soil erosion
Issue Date1998
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4125
Citation
Hydrological Processes, 1998, v. 12 n. 13-14, p. 2029-2042 How to Cite?
AbstractRunoff and soil erosion, based upon plot studies, have been reviewed for southern China. They reveal, with the exception of tree crops, no strong association for a given land use between runoff and erosion. The data support the concept of vegetation as a major control upon runoff and sediment production. Forest and woodland have an average erosion rate of 0.05 t ha-1 year-1; the lowest rate for a given cover. Tree crops experience a slightly higher erosion rate followed by a scrub-grass cover. Cultivated slopes and bare soil, with respective mean erosion rates of 62.4 and 153.0 t ha-1 year-1, experience the greatest erosion. In terms of runoff production the ranking (low to high) goes from forest-woodland, scrub-grass to tree crops and bare to cultivated slopes. Sediment yield and runoff under various ground covers are presented as a ratio to those obtained under forest and this underlines the influence of land use. Further support is given by the use of additional studies from South-east Asia and Tanzania. Variability of sediment production, and to a lesser extent runoff under any given land use or cover, is an important feature of the data. Results from a study in Hong Kong support the importance of ground cover in controlling erosion. For example, sediment yield in splash pans on two plots where vegetation was cut were 2.6 and 3.8 times those of the control. Two plots, which were burnt, had sediment catches 5.4 and 3.1 times those of the control. However, observations of suspended sediment levels in a small stream suggest no great change in sediment levels after burning, which raises the question of sediment delivery from slopes to channels. The erosion rates reported for cultivation raise the question as to how long such rates can continue before productivity is affected. Further consideration needs to be given to economic aspects of erosion and to temporal variability.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86198
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.768
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.419
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHill, RDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeart, MRen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:14:00Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:14:00Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHydrological Processes, 1998, v. 12 n. 13-14, p. 2029-2042en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0885-6087en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86198-
dc.description.abstractRunoff and soil erosion, based upon plot studies, have been reviewed for southern China. They reveal, with the exception of tree crops, no strong association for a given land use between runoff and erosion. The data support the concept of vegetation as a major control upon runoff and sediment production. Forest and woodland have an average erosion rate of 0.05 t ha-1 year-1; the lowest rate for a given cover. Tree crops experience a slightly higher erosion rate followed by a scrub-grass cover. Cultivated slopes and bare soil, with respective mean erosion rates of 62.4 and 153.0 t ha-1 year-1, experience the greatest erosion. In terms of runoff production the ranking (low to high) goes from forest-woodland, scrub-grass to tree crops and bare to cultivated slopes. Sediment yield and runoff under various ground covers are presented as a ratio to those obtained under forest and this underlines the influence of land use. Further support is given by the use of additional studies from South-east Asia and Tanzania. Variability of sediment production, and to a lesser extent runoff under any given land use or cover, is an important feature of the data. Results from a study in Hong Kong support the importance of ground cover in controlling erosion. For example, sediment yield in splash pans on two plots where vegetation was cut were 2.6 and 3.8 times those of the control. Two plots, which were burnt, had sediment catches 5.4 and 3.1 times those of the control. However, observations of suspended sediment levels in a small stream suggest no great change in sediment levels after burning, which raises the question of sediment delivery from slopes to channels. The erosion rates reported for cultivation raise the question as to how long such rates can continue before productivity is affected. Further consideration needs to be given to economic aspects of erosion and to temporal variability.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4125en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHydrological Processesen_HK
dc.rightsHydrological Processes. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectErosion controlen_HK
dc.subjectLand useen_HK
dc.subjectMan-environment relationsen_HK
dc.subjectRunoffen_HK
dc.subjectSoil erosionen_HK
dc.titleLand use, runoff, erosion and their control: a review for southern Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0885-6087&volume=12&spage=2029&epage=2042&date=1998&atitle=Land+use,+runoff,+erosion+and+their+control:+a+review+for+southern+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeart, MR:mrpeart@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeart, MR=rp00612en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032194758en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros45334en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032194758&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue13-14en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2029en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2042en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHill, RD=7404752711en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeart, MR=7003362850en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats