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Article: Chinese urbanism in question: State, society, and the reproduction of urban spaces

TitleChinese urbanism in question: State, society, and the reproduction of urban spaces
Authors
KeywordsChina
Comparative urbanism
Neoliberalism
Political economy
Urbanization
Issue Date2007
PublisherBellwether Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bellpub.com/ug/
Citation
Urban Geography, 2007, v. 28 n. 1, p. 7-29 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examines the growth and spatiality of Chinese urbanism with special reference to changes in state-society relations. Imperial China was well-known for a relatively strong state, weak society, and underdeveloped market. Earlier Chinese urbanism was shaped by an imperial state of tributary nature, a society stratified in the Confucian doctrine, and a relatively relaxed state-society relation. In the socialist era, important features of (anti-)urbanism were linked with a special state-society relation that privileges the interests of the working class, discriminates merchants, values equality, and stresses urban manageability. The reformation of state-society relations in the post-socialist era has facilitated the growth of modern urbanism characterized by the dramatic expansion of urban size, high inner-city density, growing diversity, heterogeneity, and inequality. The urban scale has been expanded and stretched as the state manages to negotiate with forces of globalization, enhance China's international competitiveness, and maintain domestic social stability. Chinese urbanism has been hybrid, path-dependent, and locally constituted, blending elements from the past with the present and the local with the global. Copyright © 2007 by V.H. Winston & Son, Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86145
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.322
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.584
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, GCSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:13:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:13:24Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationUrban Geography, 2007, v. 28 n. 1, p. 7-29en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0272-3638en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86145-
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the growth and spatiality of Chinese urbanism with special reference to changes in state-society relations. Imperial China was well-known for a relatively strong state, weak society, and underdeveloped market. Earlier Chinese urbanism was shaped by an imperial state of tributary nature, a society stratified in the Confucian doctrine, and a relatively relaxed state-society relation. In the socialist era, important features of (anti-)urbanism were linked with a special state-society relation that privileges the interests of the working class, discriminates merchants, values equality, and stresses urban manageability. The reformation of state-society relations in the post-socialist era has facilitated the growth of modern urbanism characterized by the dramatic expansion of urban size, high inner-city density, growing diversity, heterogeneity, and inequality. The urban scale has been expanded and stretched as the state manages to negotiate with forces of globalization, enhance China's international competitiveness, and maintain domestic social stability. Chinese urbanism has been hybrid, path-dependent, and locally constituted, blending elements from the past with the present and the local with the global. Copyright © 2007 by V.H. Winston & Son, Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBellwether Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bellpub.com/ug/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofUrban Geographyen_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectComparative urbanismen_HK
dc.subjectNeoliberalismen_HK
dc.subjectPolitical economyen_HK
dc.subjectUrbanizationen_HK
dc.titleChinese urbanism in question: State, society, and the reproduction of urban spacesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0272-3638&volume=28&issue=1&spage=7&epage=29&date=2007&atitle=Chinese+urbanism+in+question:+State,+society,+and+the+reproduction+of+urban+spacesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLin, GCS:gcslin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLin, GCS=rp00609en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.2747/0272-3638.28.1.7en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34247273443en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros134887en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34247273443&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume28en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage7en_HK
dc.identifier.epage29en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245342200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, GCS=7401699741en_HK

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