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Article: Quantitative assessment of the treescape and cityscape of Nanjing, China

TitleQuantitative assessment of the treescape and cityscape of Nanjing, China
Authors
KeywordsCityscape
Nanjing
Species diversity
Treescape
Urban forest
Urban landscape
Urban tree
Issue Date2003
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0921-2973
Citation
Landscape Ecology, 2003, v. 18 n. 4, p. 395-412 How to Cite?
AbstractThe urban landscape is by nature the result of many cultural and natural factors and processes. Cityscape associated with land attributes and human activities expresses a city's social and economic functions. Treescape in the form of species composition, tree dimension and tree performance echoes ecological and environmental functions. The cityscape can be denoted by urban factors, such as tree growing-space condition, tree management regime, human activities and planting history. The hypothesis that the cityscape plays a key role in molding the treescape is tested. Nanjing, an east China city notable for its high tree coverage, is chosen as the study area. A quantitative method has been developed to assess the relationship between cityscape and treescape. Based on statistical analyses on the surveyed results of 6527 trees and related cityscape attributes, this paper explores the pertinent patterns and underlying factors of treescape variations. Species composition has the strongest association with cityscape. Roadside and factories have lower species diversity. Residential and industrial land uses show smaller tree dimension. Trees in residential, commercial, heavy industrial land-uses perform below par. A three-way classification has been developed to examine the effects of urban factors on treescape at different cityscape scales. At the small scale, a well-vegetated groundcover will ensure better tree performance and a lower management burden. The medium-scale cityscape (land-use and habitat) is preferred in the study of treescape attributes and their spatial variations, and is suitable for urban tree planning and management.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86144
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.657
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.794
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, SSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:13:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:13:24Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLandscape Ecology, 2003, v. 18 n. 4, p. 395-412en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0921-2973en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86144-
dc.description.abstractThe urban landscape is by nature the result of many cultural and natural factors and processes. Cityscape associated with land attributes and human activities expresses a city's social and economic functions. Treescape in the form of species composition, tree dimension and tree performance echoes ecological and environmental functions. The cityscape can be denoted by urban factors, such as tree growing-space condition, tree management regime, human activities and planting history. The hypothesis that the cityscape plays a key role in molding the treescape is tested. Nanjing, an east China city notable for its high tree coverage, is chosen as the study area. A quantitative method has been developed to assess the relationship between cityscape and treescape. Based on statistical analyses on the surveyed results of 6527 trees and related cityscape attributes, this paper explores the pertinent patterns and underlying factors of treescape variations. Species composition has the strongest association with cityscape. Roadside and factories have lower species diversity. Residential and industrial land uses show smaller tree dimension. Trees in residential, commercial, heavy industrial land-uses perform below par. A three-way classification has been developed to examine the effects of urban factors on treescape at different cityscape scales. At the small scale, a well-vegetated groundcover will ensure better tree performance and a lower management burden. The medium-scale cityscape (land-use and habitat) is preferred in the study of treescape attributes and their spatial variations, and is suitable for urban tree planning and management.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0921-2973en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLandscape Ecologyen_HK
dc.subjectCityscapeen_HK
dc.subjectNanjingen_HK
dc.subjectSpecies diversityen_HK
dc.subjectTreescapeen_HK
dc.subjectUrban foresten_HK
dc.subjectUrban landscapeen_HK
dc.subjectUrban treeen_HK
dc.titleQuantitative assessment of the treescape and cityscape of Nanjing, Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0921-2973&volume=18&issue=4&spage=395&epage=412&date=2003&atitle=Quantitative+Assessment+of+the+Treescape+and+Cityscape+of+Nanjing,+Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY:hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1026146123459en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0242656333en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros90505en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0242656333&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume18en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage395en_HK
dc.identifier.epage412en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000185919200004-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, SS=7410253724en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2941022-

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